Follow This Blog: RSS feed
A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

This Memorial Day, Create a Military History Book Club

Featuring a LibGuide created for librarians interested in creating a military history book club. “The purpose of these clubs is neither to encourage nor to discourage military service. Rather, it is to provide easy-to-implement opportunities for young people to explore an interest they already have, making use of resources in the library, shared discussions, and adult guidance to deepen their understanding.”

Review of the Day: Maximillian Fly by Angie Sage

“I am Fly. Maximillian Fly. I am a good creature. I am not bad, as some will tell you.” Considering that Maximillian is a human/cockroach hybrid of sorts, this is not particularly surprising news. Meet the dystopian/Steampunk/action adventure novel that’s like nothing you’ve ever read before.

Book Chat: LeUyen Pham on Bear Came Along

“It’s almost as if he grew a tree in a garden and didn’t allow any of the leaves to grow on it at all, it’s just the bare bones of a tree, and asked me to come in and decorate the tree. But without that strength of that tree, nothing would hold up on it.” LeUyen Pham and Victoria Stapleton talk about the fabulous picture book Bear Came Along.

Off-Handed Art: Collecting the Sketches of Visiting Children’s Book Creators

When an illustrator is making a visit to a library, it is customary for the children’s librarians to provide large easels and pieces of paper upon which the creator might draw something. Then, I have no doubt, many librarians save these sketches. But how old is this practice?

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Who Needs Donuts? by Mark Alan Stamaty

“It’s like the Where’s Waldo of literature!” This week we’re celebrating another cult classic picture book just as its author releases his adult collection MacDoodle Street. It fails the stranger danger test magnificently, sure, but we can all get behind its “inspired sense of the absurd.”

Review of the Day: Maybe Tomorrow? by Charlotte Agell, ill. Ana Ramírez González

Today I look at an infinitely gentle take on the feelings we lug around inside of ourselves and why we don’t have to always lug them on our own. Maybe Tomorrow? is, at its heart, about how to be a good friend. A seemingly simple lesson for a deeply complex world.

What We Keep Hidden Away

Fess up, librarians. Let it out. What do you keep in a drawer or cabinet or closet that you cannot part with?

Book Trailer Reveal: My Name is Wakawakaloch by Chana Stiefel and Mary Sullivan

Wrack my brain though I have, I can’t think of a picture book that specifically discusses the mispronunciation of the protagonist’s name. I mean, we’ve had lots of name-related picture books. My Name Is Yoon. Chrysanthemum. The Name Jar. Alma. But about the way you say it specifically? Hmmm.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Perez and Martina by Pura Belpre, ill. Carlos Sanchez

“Folktales! They don’t end the way you expect ’em to . . . if they’re authentic.” We might have quite a debate over what the oldest #ownvoices picture book published in America is, that is arguably famous to this day, and that also is written by someone who wasn’t white and European. My vote goes to today’s book circa 1932.

Review of the Day: The Crayon Man by Natascha Biebow and Steven Salerno

The ideal use of great writing without cheating. Filled with facts and backmatter, it also makes the subject interesting to kids. It’s beautiful to look at and while I would have made some changes, it stands as a pretty darn good look at a man, a plan, a crayon. Crayola.

Blurb Blurb Blurb Blurb

Who would be your Top Five aspirational blurbees? The five people you’d like to receive blurbs from for your books. They wouldn’t have to work in the children’s book field, necessarily. It would just be neat if they said something nice about your book.

Poetry Month Ain’t Over Till I Sez It’s Over: The Shockingly Good Verse of 2019

Gather round me, ye children. I know we’re in May, but poetry can shine every day of the year if it wants to. This is all the new good stuff. You know you wanna know what’s worthy.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel by Virginia Lee Burton

Ramona’s not the only one calling aspects of Mike Mulligan into question anymore. This is a tale of “a man obsessed with his steam shovel,” as well as muffs, dabbing, how precisely a steam shovel would work, and the weird placement of the acknowledgement to Dickie Birkinbush, mid-book.

The Translation Conundrum: What to Do? What to Do?

If you wanted more translated children’s books here in America, what kinds of concrete proposals would you give to publishers, translators, and non-profits?

Review of the Day: Trace by Pat Cummings

With Trace, Ms. Cummings takes time to examine what we owe our ancestors, even as we try to live our daily lives. We live with their decisions, whether we want to or not, and sometimes we relive their mistakes. This is a ghost story that asks you to stop and listen to the voices that are dead but not gone. Who are the ghosts that haunt your story? And what are they trying to tell you?