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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Social Distancing in the Studio: The Eric Carle Museum Presents Its First Virtual Exhibit

As of yesterday, The Eric Carle Museum is presenting its first virtual exhibit. Called ART in PLACE: Social Distancing in the Studio, the show consists of 21 picture-book artists, isolating in their studios, working in the midst of a pandemic. Or, as Executive Director Alexandra Kennedy puts it, “We may all be in isolation—but these artists are helping to make sure we don’t feel isolated.”

Could COVID-19 Mark the End of the Physical Galley?

From an economic standpoint, it would make a lot of sense for publishers to look at the current shift from physical to electronic galleys and say, “Okay. This is how we’re doing it from now on.” But is that for the best?

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Day the Cow Sneezed by James Flora

I’ve always been a big fan of this book, but as we have learned time and time again, just because I like something, that is NO indication that Kate will as well.

Review of the Day: Nerp! by Sarah Lynne Reul

You know those parents that get roped into reading to their kids’ preschool/Kindergarten/church group and walk aimlessly through libraries and bookstores in a hazy daze of barely contained fear? This book is for them. Guaranteed laughs, short content, and the kind of book I could see a kid demanding over and over again. Worth buying? “Yerp!”

How to Get Your Modern Jewish Protagonist Into the Mainstream (In a Fun Way): A Terri Libenson Interview

Today we sit down and chat with professional cartoonist Terri Libenson as she walks us through the ins and outs of depicting a bat mitzvah’s meaning and awkwardness in a modern book age.

Thoughts (and Videos) of Hans Christian Andersen: The Journey of His Life

Hans Christian Andersen was a weird dude. Today I premiere a video that shows some art from a book about him. Whatta fella.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg

“Candyland is more complex than this game looks.” Continuity errors? Devil chimpanzees? John Cleese cameos? Kate and I discuss the book that spurred on all those movie franchises.

Librarian Preview: Small Publisher Spotlight (Summer-Fall 2020)

From sourdough starters to fairytales, bats, and migrants, here’s a round-up of a slew of small publishers and what they have coming out in the summer and fall.

Review of the Day : We Are Power by Todd Hasak-Lowy

You don’t need to be a president or a military leader to change the world. Anyone can do it but it takes faith and numbers. It takes smarts and skills and morals. And what it really takes is a knowledge of history. Of what works and what doesn’t. It takes this book. Now hand it to someone who needs it.

Strega Corona and the Magic Sourdough Starter: A COVID-19 Tale for Our Times

Distance learning takes a turn for the strange when I get to be in charge.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Mirandy and Brother Wind by Patricia McKissack and Jerry Pinkney

“I’m giving myself extra points for doing this springy book in spring . . . which I did not realize until this moment. Patting on the backy of me!” Prior to today’s episode the only Jerry Pinkney title we’d done on our podcast was Sam and the Tigers (as part of our Little Black Sambo […]

Review of the Day: Fighting Words by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Not every 12-year-old is going to be ready for the abuse and pain addressed in Bradley’s latest. But for those kids that want a book can be honest with them about the world, written at their age-level, with funny parts and a happy ending where things get better, this is that book. It ain’t easy but it’s there for you.

The Last Dance of the Tiger King: Kidlit Connections For Quarantine Times

I’ve been stuck inside too long. I can’t help it anymore. I have to . . have to . . . have to write the silliest post about our current times I could think of. Beware!

Nature When We Most Need It: Nikki Grimes Guest Posts in a Time of COVID-19

“Too often, children’s books by black authors have been limited by the prison of the single story, the notion that all black people share a single lived experience, and that experience, generally portrayed as heavy or edgy, usually takes place within an inner city landscape, where few rivers run, few trees grow, and birdsong is the last thing on anybody’s mind. Light, joyful, or quiet stories about our deep engagement with nature, therefore, constitute a publishing space black authors have not been encouraged to enter—until now.” Nikki Grimes provides today’s guest post on her latest book.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: A Time to Keep by Tasha Tudor

Because it was my birthday I got to choose a book that was my favorite when I was growing up. The end result is that I spend a great deal of time trying to explain some of the oddities by saying, “It’s New England!” Like it helps or something. The best way to put it is that this book is 70s/1870s.