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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Video Sunday: Giant monsters and tiny ladies

Censorship Video Sunday: Giant monsters and tiny ladies

Thanks to @doseofsnark for the link.

Ah, Banned Books Week.  It only comes but once a year (as opposed to banning books which appears to be a year long occupation).  For the one stop shopping round-up everyone needs, bookshelves of doom has compiled just a top notch collection of links for the occasion.  One of these is to the blog for ALA’s Office of Intellectual Freedom.  They’ve started posting video testimonials from authors.  One of them?  My man Jay Asher.  Tell it like it is, Jay!

Also recommended, the Bigfoot Reads Scientific Approach to Book Banning.

Were it not Banned Books Week, of course, I would have begun with what I’m going to far as to declare the Best Book Trailer of the Year.  See if you agree:

Seriously.  That rocked my socks.

Speaking of sock rocking, I don’t know if you were aware of the creation of the animated take on Mary Norton’s The Borrowers out there, but the film is done and coming out.  Doesn’t look half shabby either.

Arietty Video Sunday: Giant monsters and tiny ladies

Those of you curious as to how good it is (and how it diverges from the book) may want to visit this review over at Fantastic Reads.

I’m awfully grateful to this next video because it clarifies for me what exactly this new collection of Dr. Seuss stories being promoted right now (The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories) actually is.  As you’ll see, they weren’t some stories left in a drawer that Seuss “didn’t think were good enough” for publication.  I think that’s an important distinction to make and I love that this tells you a bit of backstory as well.

Thanks to Mary Van Akin for the link.

So I’m in my library the other day and who should just waltz through the door, easy as you please, but none other than Sam McBratney of Guess How Much I Love You? Yup.  He was in town from Ireland and he and his wife were determined to see two books: The Story of Ping by Marjorie Flack and a book called Myrtle the Turtle.  Well, we couldn’t help them with Myrtle (it’s not the Keith Robertson version I assure you) but we did have an original edition of Ping so I whipped that out right quick.  I told him how much my daughter enjoys that new four page crinkle version of the story.  Had I but looked under my desk I would have seen that I had a copy of the new pop-up version of Guess How Much I Love You.  And there’s a trailer too!

Thanks to Mary Kuehner for the link.

And finally for our off-topic video for the day . . . . 100 years of what to wear in 100 seconds.

Thanks to Lori Ess for the link.

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Elizabeth Bird About Elizabeth Bird

Elizabeth Bird is currently New York Public Library's Youth Materials Collections Specialist. She has served on Newbery, written for Horn Book, and has done other lovely little things that she'd love to tell you about but that she's sure you'd find more interesting to hear of in person. Her opinions are her own and do not reflect those of NYPL, SLJ, or any of the other acronyms you might be able to name. Follow her on Twitter: @fuseeight.

Comments

  1. Ali B says:

    Thank you so much for linking to Fantastic Reads!

  2. Excited for the Borrowers adaptation. While Miyazaki wasn’t as involved as I initially hoped I have no doubt that he wouldn’t have trusted this film to anyone he didn’t think couldn’t pull it off. I am also sure we can blame Disney for the terrible rhyming narration in the trailer.

  3. I may just have to reblog that first link (so that my readers may learn to protect themselves, of course). Thanks for posting!