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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Fusenews: In which I find the barest hint of an excuse to post a Rex Stout cover

  • I’ve been watching The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt recently.  So far the resident husband and I have only made it through two episodes, but I was pleased as punch when I learned that the plot twist in storyline #2 hinged on a Baby-Sitter’s Club novel.  Specifically Babysitter’s Club Mystery No. 12: Dawn and the Surfer Ghost.  Peter Lerangis, was this one of yours?  Here’s a breakdown of the book’s plot with a healthy dose of snark, in case you’re interested.
  • Good old Adam Rex.  Don’t know if you knew it but he’s got this little old major feature film in theaters right now (Home).  Meanwhile in California, the Gallery Nucleus is doing an exhibition of Rex’s work.  Running from March 28th to April 19th, the art will be from the books The True Meaning of Smekday and Chu’s Day.  Get it while it’s hot!
  • Boy, Brain Pickings just knows its stuff.  There are plenty of aggregator sites out there that regurgitate the same old children’s stuff over and over again.  Brain Pickings actually writes their pieces and puts some thought into what they do.  Case in point, a recent piece on the best children’s books on death, grief, and mourning.  The choices are unusual, recent, and interesting.

Chomping at the bit to read the latest Lockwood & Company book by Jonathan Stroud?  It’s a mediocre salve but you may as well enjoy his homage to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.  Mind you, I was an Hercule Poirot fan born and bred growing up, but I acknowledge that that Doyle has his place.  And don’t tell Stroud, but his books are FAR closer to the Nero Wolfe stories in terms of tone anyway.

Over at The Battle of the Books the fighting rages on.  We’ve lost so many good soldiers in this fight.  If you read only one decision, however, read Nathan Hale’s.  Future judges would do well to emulate his style.  Indeed, is there any other way to do it?

You may be one of the three individuals in the continental U.S. who has not seen Travis Jonker’s blog post on The Art of the Picture Book Barcode.  If you’re only just learning about it now, boy are you in for a treat.

“Really? Rosé?”

That one took some thought.

  • Daily Image:

And now, the last and greatest flashdrive you will ever own:

Could just be a librarian thing, but I think I’m right in saying it reeks of greatness.  Many thanks to Stephanie Whelan for the link.

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About Elizabeth Bird

Elizabeth Bird is currently the Collection Development Manager of the Evanston Public Library system and a former Materials Specialist for New York Public Library. She has served on Newbery, written for Horn Book, and has done other lovely little things that she'd love to tell you about but that she's sure you'd find more interesting to hear of in person. Her opinions are her own and do not reflect those of EPL, SLJ, or any of the other acronyms you might be able to name. Follow her on Twitter: @fuseeight.

Comments

  1. Amy Sears says:

    I love the Nero Wolfe connection with Lockwood & Co. so true and I love the Nero Wolfe books (actually prefer them to Poirot)

  2. The buzz about BSC references in Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt mayyyyy have played a role in my recent decision to join Netflix. I mean, Tina Fey was involved too. But BSC references!

  3. Oh that wasn’t my review style–I was reviewing in the old Iron Chef judge style, breaking the books down to separate battles. Glad you liked it! My poor winning book is already dead.

    • But, Nathan, maybe it will come back from the dead — find out tomorrow! (Love knowing you were using Iron Chef methods for your decision.) (Monica, one third of the BOB Battle Commander.)

  4. BSC on UKS? Whaat? I will have to be the last person I know to start watching this. And so should that Mystery ghost, I suspect. Paging Ellen Miles!

    • Elizabeth Bird says:

      Seriously?! Someone didn’t tell you before me? Heck, if I’d been the showrunner I would have called you in your very home. Now wondering about Ellen. You’d better break the news to her gently, Peter.