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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Recommended Science Videos and the Reluctant Homeschool Teacher

Perhaps you have found yourself thinking, “What I really wish I could find is a series of wonderful science programs for kids that they can watch for a little while.” Well, I located three modern alternatives that have led to some pretty great conversations (and home science experiments) and I want to share them with you today.

Review of the Day: When You Look Up by Decur

A picture book and a graphic novel and an early chapter book and a bedtime story all rolled into one impossible-to-define package. I’m not even kidding when I say that When You Look Up by Decur gives you a deep and abiding faith in 21st century storytelling. Now if only I could figure out where to shelve it…

Our Favorite Day of the Year: A Talk with Iranian Illustrator Rahele Jomepour Bell

Intrigued by Rahele Jomepour Bell’s style, I interview her about the book Our Favorite Day of the Year and learn a bit more about what precisely is going on in the world of publishing both here and overseas.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Daddy’s Roommate by Michael Willhoite

In honor of Pride this month, I figured it would be a good idea to check out one of the first big-time LGBTQIA+ picture books published in America. Who knew this would be such a fruitful book to explore?

It’s the Final Countdown (of Picture Books 2010-19)

What if he asked people to rank not their top ten picture books of all time, but their ten favorite picture books of the last decade? That’s right. Just the books published between the years of 2010-19. The results have been tabulated and now they are in.

Review of the Day: Just Like Me by Vanessa Brantley-Newton

We may have spent the better part of Poetry Month sheltering in place, but that doesn’t mean poetry went to sleep. Instead, books like this one have just been biding their time. Go out. Find it. Discover it. And discover why a book this good deserves some keen adjectives in its arsenal.

Guest Post: What We’re Missing #4 by David Jacobson

Once more guest poster David Jacobson has returned to give us the 411 on international works of children’s literature that you undoubtedly have NOT encountered before.

Adventure Time meets Moomintroll? Chatting with Aliza Layne About BEETLE AND THE HOLLOWBONES

Recently I had a little online Q&A with the author Aliza Layne about her past work and her strangely touching tale of goblin witches, cutie-pie ghosts, and nerdy-at-heart skeletal gals.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Little Man, Little Man by James Baldwin, ill. Yoran Cazac

This week we consider a book that was ahead of its time when it came out and may only find its true audience today. And few books for kids tackle the issue of police brutality as honestly as this one does. Reprinted two years ago, James Baldwin’s 1976 title (the only book for children he ever made) feels both timeless and in desperate need of a new illustrator.

In Memoriam: JoAnn Jonas

On April 25, 2020 JoAnn Jonas, a truly great librarian and early childhood advocate (amongst many other things) died. Today, JoAnn’s 2002 Newbery committee will be paying homage to her life, her work, and her influence.

Guest Post: The Child is Mother of the Woman – Using Archival Clues to Write Picture Book Biographies

Amy Alznauer returns to the blog to discuss new issues in the realm of writing nonfiction for kids, particularly as they pertain to one Flannery O’Connor.

Antiracist Resources and Reads: Lists for All Ages

Yesterday, I was asked to create a booklist for my city’s patrons of some antiracist titles. I was immediately helped by about eight of my colleagues and, together, we created the following list of links. Please use this where it is most needed.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: A Fish Out of Water by Helen Palmer, ill. P.D. Eastman

On this week’s episode Kate and I tackle whether or not “Helen Palmer” was or was not Dr. Seuss, we delve into what kind of reputation Mr. Carp must have in this town, and now we have to research when fluoride entered the drinking water and when chlorine entered the public pools. It’s important!

Review of the Day: Wink by Rob Harrell

They say, write what you know. And if what you know is how to lie on a steel table, your head screwed into place, a laser pointed at your face, that might be a good place to start. We live in dark times. How dark are they? SO dark that a book about a kid with a potentially deadly eye cancer is the bit of lighthearted levity we all need and crave.

Social Distancing in the Studio: The Eric Carle Museum Presents Its First Virtual Exhibit

As of yesterday, The Eric Carle Museum is presenting its first virtual exhibit. Called ART in PLACE: Social Distancing in the Studio, the show consists of 21 picture-book artists, isolating in their studios, working in the midst of a pandemic. Or, as Executive Director Alexandra Kennedy puts it, “We may all be in isolation—but these artists are helping to make sure we don’t feel isolated.”