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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Five Chinese Brothers by Claire Huchet Bishop and Kurt Wiese

If you were born in the late 70s or early 80s, the odds are good that somebody you know read today’s book to you. This all ties in quite closely to current discussions of picture books with racist elements that sit blithely on shelves in children’s rooms anywhere.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Owl Babies by Martin Waddell, ill. Patrick Benson

In spite of the fact that I didn’t really want to have a whole conversation with Kate about owls’ elongated eye tubes, that’s the price you pay when you talk about Martin Waddell’s best known book. But is it a “classic”?

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: George Shrinks by William Joyce

Hope you like your kids short, your cats cruel, and your teddy bears creepy, because we’re going all in on Bill Joyce’s best known book today.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson

Under normal circumstances I won’t consider a children’s book for this podcast unless that title is less than 20 years old. But since I made that rule in the first place, I guess I’m the one who gets to break it. And today’s book is, in its blood, a rule breaker.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Daddy’s Roommate by Michael Willhoite

In honor of Pride this month, I figured it would be a good idea to check out one of the first big-time LGBTQIA+ picture books published in America. Who knew this would be such a fruitful book to explore?

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Little Man, Little Man by James Baldwin, ill. Yoran Cazac

This week we consider a book that was ahead of its time when it came out and may only find its true audience today. And few books for kids tackle the issue of police brutality as honestly as this one does. Reprinted two years ago, James Baldwin’s 1976 title (the only book for children he ever made) feels both timeless and in desperate need of a new illustrator.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: A Fish Out of Water by Helen Palmer, ill. P.D. Eastman

On this week’s episode Kate and I tackle whether or not “Helen Palmer” was or was not Dr. Seuss, we delve into what kind of reputation Mr. Carp must have in this town, and now we have to research when fluoride entered the drinking water and when chlorine entered the public pools. It’s important!

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Day the Cow Sneezed by James Flora

I’ve always been a big fan of this book, but as we have learned time and time again, just because I like something, that is NO indication that Kate will as well.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg

“Candyland is more complex than this game looks.” Continuity errors? Devil chimpanzees? John Cleese cameos? Kate and I discuss the book that spurred on all those movie franchises.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Mirandy and Brother Wind by Patricia McKissack and Jerry Pinkney

“I’m giving myself extra points for doing this springy book in spring . . . which I did not realize until this moment. Patting on the backy of me!” Prior to today’s episode the only Jerry Pinkney title we’d done on our podcast was Sam and the Tigers (as part of our Little Black Sambo […]

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: A Time to Keep by Tasha Tudor

Because it was my birthday I got to choose a book that was my favorite when I was growing up. The end result is that I spend a great deal of time trying to explain some of the oddities by saying, “It’s New England!” Like it helps or something. The best way to put it is that this book is 70s/1870s.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Stellaluna by Janell Cannon

Seems to me that bats are shouldering a great deal of the blame for our current COVID-19 crisis. Considering the fact that their P.R. wasn’t all that great to begin with (Batman aside), I decided we would combat this problem with the most famous bat-related picture book in America.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss

While many people remember all too well the title of today’s book, its plot (such as it is) remains, for many, a mystery. My sister certainly didn’t know what to expect and, to be fair, how could she have? Can anyone truly predict Clark or the Ying or Ned? Sweet sweet Ned?

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Oliver Button Is a Sissy by Tomie dePaola

In honor of Tomie dePaola, who left us last week, I wanted to do one of his possible classics. We had already done Strega Nona on the show, but one other book might qualify for “classic” status. Kate and I tackle a book with a tricky title.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Tell Me Again About the Night I Was Born by Jamie Lee Curtis, ill. Laura Cornell

For WEEKS Kate has been bugging me to find her a celebrity picture book. When I finally did, she found it deeply degrading to women. Why? As you’ll see, today’s book hasn’t aged particularly well.