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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Best Nest by P.D. Eastman

This week, Kate delves real deep into the marital status of dear Mr. and Mrs. Bird here (including Mr. Bird’s “extracurricular activities”, if you get my gist). We discuss how this is like a “very small version of Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds” (their reign of terror is swift and tiny). We wonder about color layering, and we get to sing the “Toldja So” song.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: My Brother Charlie by Holly Robinson & Ryan Elizabeth Peete, ill. Shane W. Evans

I can say with complete confidence that this was the first picture book about a Black kid on the autism spectrum I had ever seen when the book was first published in 2010. Recently Kate saw a list from Black Education Matters listing several books that featured Black children with disabilities and she asked if any were possible for our podcast. And lo and behold, we found one,

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Simms Taback

This old lady may be devouring the local flora and fauna at a prodigious rate, but SHE HAS A PLAN! At least we think she does. We cover a book that celebrates that classic elderly ability to unhinge your jaw.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Farmer and the Clown by Marla Frazee

Kate hates clowns. Naturally, that meant I had to find her the sweetest wordless clown picture book ever created. The results? Let’s just say she doesn’t have a clown conversion in the course of this show.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Giraffes Can’t Dance by Giles Andreae, ill. Guy Parker-Rees

I wanted to do a little something different with today’s selection for my podcast. Today’s book has been on Publisher Weekly’s top selling picture book list for 240+ weeks. Even so, it is not a household name here in America by any stretch of the imagination. I’d been seeing its name on these bestseller lists […]

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Imogene’s Antlers by David Small

On this week’s show we discuss the strength of Imogene’s neck muscles, you get to hear an impromptu jingle for the Emergency Hat Service, I manage to work in a tiny reference to Gregor Samsa, and we marvel at Imogene’s good nature.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Chato and the Party Animals by Gary Soto, ill. Susan Guevara

When we consider classic Latinx picture books that would qualify as #ownvoices, only a few have been covered on this show. Today’s book seeks to add to the canon of children’s literature.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco

Between its shiny Sydney Taylor Book Award on its cover and a storyline that has aged magnificently over the last 32 years, Kate and I discuss one of Patricia Polacco’s best known works.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Good Night, Gorilla by Peggy Rathmann

Today Kate and I dig deep into a book that certainly contains the world’s most short-sighted escape plan. The Great Escape, this is not.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: The Five Chinese Brothers by Claire Huchet Bishop and Kurt Wiese

If you were born in the late 70s or early 80s, the odds are good that somebody you know read today’s book to you. This all ties in quite closely to current discussions of picture books with racist elements that sit blithely on shelves in children’s rooms anywhere.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Owl Babies by Martin Waddell, ill. Patrick Benson

In spite of the fact that I didn’t really want to have a whole conversation with Kate about owls’ elongated eye tubes, that’s the price you pay when you talk about Martin Waddell’s best known book. But is it a “classic”?

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: George Shrinks by William Joyce

Hope you like your kids short, your cats cruel, and your teddy bears creepy, because we’re going all in on Bill Joyce’s best known book today.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson

Under normal circumstances I won’t consider a children’s book for this podcast unless that title is less than 20 years old. But since I made that rule in the first place, I guess I’m the one who gets to break it. And today’s book is, in its blood, a rule breaker.

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Daddy’s Roommate by Michael Willhoite

In honor of Pride this month, I figured it would be a good idea to check out one of the first big-time LGBTQIA+ picture books published in America. Who knew this would be such a fruitful book to explore?

Fuse 8 n’ Kate: Little Man, Little Man by James Baldwin, ill. Yoran Cazac

This week we consider a book that was ahead of its time when it came out and may only find its true audience today. And few books for kids tackle the issue of police brutality as honestly as this one does. Reprinted two years ago, James Baldwin’s 1976 title (the only book for children he ever made) feels both timeless and in desperate need of a new illustrator.