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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Social Distancing in the Studio: The Eric Carle Museum Presents Its First Virtual Exhibit

As of yesterday, The Eric Carle Museum is presenting its first virtual exhibit. Called ART in PLACE: Social Distancing in the Studio, the show consists of 21 picture-book artists, isolating in their studios, working in the midst of a pandemic. Or, as Executive Director Alexandra Kennedy puts it, “We may all be in isolation—but these artists are helping to make sure we don’t feel isolated.”

Could COVID-19 Mark the End of the Physical Galley?

From an economic standpoint, it would make a lot of sense for publishers to look at the current shift from physical to electronic galleys and say, “Okay. This is how we’re doing it from now on.” But is that for the best?

Librarian Preview: Small Publisher Spotlight (Summer-Fall 2020)

From sourdough starters to fairytales, bats, and migrants, here’s a round-up of a slew of small publishers and what they have coming out in the summer and fall.

Strega Corona and the Magic Sourdough Starter: A COVID-19 Tale for Our Times

Distance learning takes a turn for the strange when I get to be in charge.

The Last Dance of the Tiger King: Kidlit Connections For Quarantine Times

I’ve been stuck inside too long. I can’t help it anymore. I have to . . have to . . . have to write the silliest post about our current times I could think of. Beware!

Story Seeds: A Podcast for Our Time

Learn about Story Seeds, a new podcast that reveals the creative and writing process, models the value of deep listening and collaboration between children and adults, and shares great, diverse stories that inspire kids to write, imagine, and be curious about their world.

When an Artist Loves a Library: Elisha Cooper and the Jefferson Market Branch

The relationship between artist and library branch is a special one. Today we feature an epic love story for the ages.

A Good Old-Fashioned Nonfiction / Informational Fiction Debate

A rip-roaring conversation (with only minimal bloodshed) between myself and author Amy Alznauer about the border between fiction and nonfiction in the realm of children’s books and how carefully it should be guarded.

Hey, Whatever Happened With the Rabbit hOle? The Future of the World’s First Explor-a-Storium

Imagine a place that turns the entire notion of children’s books and museums on their head. Picture an Explor-a-Storium a.k.a. an interactive children’s museum where everything inside is children’s book related. Mad, you say? Absolutely. Now check out how close we are to completion…

Trendwatch 2020: Death Death Death Death Death

The most sweeping trend of 2020? That’s right. It’s dead dogs. Better grab your hankies now.

21st Century Oral Storytelling: How PJ Library Connects Kids to Their Heritage via Podcasting

“Folktales were an oral tradition before they were a book tradition.” I interview Meredith Lewis about why podcasts for kids are an ideal venue for carrying on Jewish storytelling traditions.

Children’s Literary Obituaries: What We Lost in 2019

While we traipse merrily into a new decade and a new era, it’s not the worst idea to look back and pay tribute to the authors and illustrators of children’s books we lost in 2019. Here is a recap of the creators that we should stand back and remember at least one more time

Put a Little Swag In Your Step (2019 edition)

This year, I decided to meticulously keep track of every little bit of swag that came my way. Here is a full accounting of what I have found, broken down by category. Perhaps it will be of use or interest to anyone who wishes to start delving into swag of their own.

The Scourge of Skyward Knitting Needles: It Continues

It’s baaaaack! That most wonderful time of the year where we determine once and for all whether or not skilled illustrators are capable of rendering knitting needles correctly on a picture book page. A weird obsession, I’ll grant, but an oddly rewarding one.

Betsy Doesn’t Have Time for Your Nostalgia Today

Over the years I’ve heard lots of adults make comments about the tawdry state of children’s books today. So allow me now to address these concerns. What, I ask, makes you think children’s books today don’t cut it?