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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Frog and Toad Were More Than Friends: A Guest Post by Kyle Lukoff

“While I don’t want queerness to always be relegated to the shadows, overhead lighting doesn’t do anyone any favors, either.” Kyle Lukoff tells us tales of Frogs and Toads, secret rooms, and the longstanding tradition of queer values in children’s literature.

Edi Campbell: Two Reviews

Toni Morrison once said that literary discourse should transform “from the racial object to the racial subject; from the described and imagined to the describers and imaginers; from the serving to the served.” Today Edi Campbell critiques beyond literary devices and provides a review based in critical literary analysis.

#passthemic: Edith Campbell Takes Over A Fuse #8 Production for the Week

I am pleased to announce that this week you’re going to hear an entirely different voice here at the blog A Fuse #8 Production. In the spirit of #passthemic, where white people give over their platforms to people that deserve a wider audience, I am giving over full reign of this site to Edith Campbell.

Guest Post: What We’re Missing #4 by David Jacobson

Once more guest poster David Jacobson has returned to give us the 411 on international works of children’s literature that you undoubtedly have NOT encountered before.

Guest Post: The Child is Mother of the Woman – Using Archival Clues to Write Picture Book Biographies

Amy Alznauer returns to the blog to discuss new issues in the realm of writing nonfiction for kids, particularly as they pertain to one Flannery O’Connor.

Nature When We Most Need It: Nikki Grimes Guest Posts in a Time of COVID-19

“Too often, children’s books by black authors have been limited by the prison of the single story, the notion that all black people share a single lived experience, and that experience, generally portrayed as heavy or edgy, usually takes place within an inner city landscape, where few rivers run, few trees grow, and birdsong is the last thing on anybody’s mind. Light, joyful, or quiet stories about our deep engagement with nature, therefore, constitute a publishing space black authors have not been encouraged to enter—until now.” Nikki Grimes provides today’s guest post on her latest book.

Timeless: Tom’s Midnight Garden. Guest Post by Fred Guida

It’s guest post time again, and Fred Guida has returned with another classic in mind. Remember Tom’s Midnight Garden by Philippa Pearce? Then take it away, Fred!

Guest Post: Wrestling with School Library Closures by J. F. Fox

There will come a time when this pandemic ends and we can get back to business as usual. Which is to say, the business of fighting to protect our school libraries and school librarians from the chopping block. Written before the arrival of COVID-19, author J.F. Fox’s piece here today is no less timely for what it has to say.

Guest Post: What We’re Missing: Gems of World Kid Lit #2.

David Jacobson comes to recount the creation of the Japan-China-Korea Peace Picture Book Project. This includes the books in the series and the issues faced in the three countries in this ambitious and sensitive project.

In Which the Proprietor of This Blog Allows One Christian McKay Heidicker to Speak His Piece

Today we welcome newly minted Newbery Honor winning author Chrstian McKay Heidicker to talk about his latest book. And no. It does not involve a psychotic Beatrix Potter . . . . yet.

Guest Post: Tom Lichtenheld Gives Us a Peek Into “When My Brother Gets Home”

When My Brother Gets Home has already bagged a couple starred reviews and it’s coming out today. To celebrate, creator Tom Lichtenheld gives us a bit on the backstory of how it all went down.

Putting the Big Bang In Its Place: Guest Post by Marissa Moss

The other day publisher and author Marissa Moss of Creston Books sent me an interesting query. We all know that the bar has risen for nonfiction authors and even, to a certain extent, illustrators of children’s books. But what is the role of the publisher in all this? A guest post on accuracy in nonfiction.

Resources for Immigration: Links for High School Students

The students of Marc Aronson’s Rutgers Masters’s class on Young Adults, Reading, and Literacy set out to curate resources for high school students related to immigration. Take a look at them for yourself and pass them on to a teacher you know.

Guest Post – Beyond 3 Percent: Translated Children’s Literature in the U.S.

86% of translations are published by small presses. What is the state of children’s literature today and how should it change? David Jacobson guests with some answers.

Guest Post: Doing Impossible Things: Ideas for Supporting Children in Foster Care by Lindsay Lackey

Today I’m bowing out and letting an author with some chops take the reins. Ms. Lindsay Lackey, to be precise. As you may be aware, she has a book out this year called All the Impossible Things. To write this book, Lackey was inspired by her aunt and uncle. Today she talks a bit about them, and about the simple, small acts that you can do to uplift a child in foster care.