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Bowllan's Blog
Inside Bowllan's Blog

The Emergency Teacher and more

I have to admit, Mohonk was great, but my regular blog postings – or lack there of - has certainly taken a backseat. 

So here’s what I’m catching up on:

1) Remember Rosie? She was our inspirational student, who, back in May, was in a devastating car accident and was unable to attend her 6th grade graduation. Well, I was overjoyed to receive updates on her progress.

2) Next, we all talk about A.D.D., but what are we doing about it? That said, we could all benefit from the resources on A.D.D or Asperger’s Syndrome, by visiting Annie Books. "The Annie Books" are a must read for any parent, teacher, professional, or child with the challenges of Asperger’s Syndrome.

3) What’s an "Amerijam Thanksgiving?" It’s how some foreign teachers in the midstate region added international flare to Thanksgiving.
"Exchange teachers from Colombia, South Africa and Romania who teach in Bibb schools are also coming to the holiday dinner with Smith and bringing their own native dishes." Yummy.

515M35wL1HL. SS500  The Emergency Teacher and more 4) Lastly, for now, because of how I entered the field of education, The Emergency Teacherby Christina Asquith, is a story that hits close to home for me. 
I am currently reading about Christina’s experiences and admiring her courage. Here’s a blurb from her website. "christina The Emergency Teacher and moreWhen twenty-five-year-old Christina Asquith leaves her job with The Philadelphia Inquirer to teach, she aspires to “make a difference in a child’s life,” or so promises the School District of Philadelphia’s marketing brochure. Without certification or training—an “emergency teacher”—Ms. Asquith is hired on the spot and (unknowingly) assigned to the classroom that few veteran teachers would take: sixth grade in the city’s oldest school building, in a crime-infested neighborhood known as The Badlands. “Sink or swim,” Ms. Asquith is told on her first day."  [At least she was told that. Most times you never hear a word on what to do.]