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Writers Against Racism: Places in the Heart (Revisited)

In case you missed SLJ writer, Rick Margolis’s, Places in the Heart: Celebrating Black History Month, CLICK HERE. He’s right when he opens the article with, “Talk about hitting the lottery.” 

It is indeed a find!

Margolis writes, “That’s how we felt when we asked some of the top kids’ book creators to choose their favorite children’s book about the black experience. The title could be for kids of any age—from a picture book or graphic novel to a chapter book or collection of poems. We told them it could be new or old, fiction or nonfiction. The only requirement? It had to be a book that they truly loved—and, of course, it couldn’t be one of their own.” (Rick Margolis, School Library Journal)

Take a look and I am sure you will agree.

Comments

  1. Every country deals with race differently. The two biggest mistakes in American history once one gets beyond slavery: (1) forced integration by court rulings – you can’t force people to want to associate with, get along with, or respect you; and (2) affirmative action – no matter how one looks at it, it smacks of unfairness and does not make people respect you.

    What we have today are simply the long-term ramifications of bad racial policies. What is perhaps more fascinating is that many think that 50 years of legal integration has somehow negated or counterbalanced the treatment afforded blacks prior thereto.

    The reason that society is incapable of addressing the racial issue is because we view it from a perspective which is not conducive to real analysis. We talk all around the fundamental, underlying reasons for racism, and make it an emotional issue. How does one expect to cure the cancer without focusing on the cancerous cells and the biological reasons for cancer? Focusing on the symptoms is an ineffective mechanism to employ. Racism serves a far more complex and pragmatic function than we are generally willing to acknowledge.

  2. Nathalie says:

    I wasn’t aware of that post, Amy. Thank you for linking it. Merry Sunday!