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‘Tales of the Night,’ ‘The Dark Knight Returns,’ and the Problem of Animation for Teens

Tales of the Night - 4 Large

What animation exists out there that’s regularly screened in schools or shelved in libraries that’s the equivalent of MG or YA lit—feature films (not TV shows) that speak to young people but not to “children”?

Please Take This, Copy It, Use It, Improve It: A Digital Fandom Checklist

Teen Fans of K-pop
(photo credit: Joseph A Ferris III americaninnorthkorea.com/)

Teaching librarians and language arts educators have, via fandom, a unique opening to reframe netiquette as something other than a subset of character education or online safety.

Guest Post by Maria Selke… There and Back Again: (Re)Visiting ‘The Hobbit’ in Image and Text (1)

The-Hobbit-poster-2

A year ago, I wouldn’t have considered examining trailers in a reading group…

Guest Post by Gabrielle Bondi… Five Things Readers and Fans Don’t Know About YA Movies But Should (Part 2)

Divergent cover

After leaving the test screening for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Pt. 1, I was bombarded with questions about literally every scene in the book.

Moonrise Kingdom’s Lesson: Tweens are the New Teens… and the New Adults

Moonrise Kingdom - 550

Stories about tweens simply aren’t like those about teens or adults or “children”…

Some Major No-No’s for Student Critics… and All Critics, Really

"The Critic" -- an 1817 engraving by (Allen) Robert Branston. Note the scowl. That hasn't changed, at least not from where I'm sitting.

“Certainly, some adult humans will be shocked to learn that they cannot simply pick up a comic book and hurl it at the nearest child.” -Dylan Meconis

Why We Respond to “Chronicle” – Part 2: Found Footage and Narrative Immersion

He crumples the car without touching it... similarly, we live out our dark desires on the screen without being on the screen. (image courtesy of Fox)

A connection with the point-of-view character sometimes isn’t made because words and ideas somehow get in the way of immediacy rather than reinforcing it. So when we attempt to show the cost of not appreciating literature by referencing the beauty and profundity of those words and ideas, we’re possibly compounding the problem…