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Connect the Pop
Inside Connect the Pop

Transmedia in Schools and Libraries: Thoughts and Strategies from Tyler Weaver

Marvel Universe 1960s

“How can you tell a story in a game and have it be school-appropriate, while simultaneously making the student think about the implications of what they enjoy playing?”

Guest Post by Gabrielle Bondi… Five Things Readers and Fans Don’t Know About YA Movies But Should (Part 2)

Divergent cover

After leaving the test screening for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Pt. 1, I was bombarded with questions about literally every scene in the book.

Guest Post by Robin Brenner… This Summer’s Female Heroes: Fighting More Than One Battle (2)

Anne Hathaway as Catwoman/Selina Kyle

The mainstream comics industry has been roundly (and justifiably) criticized for its problematic representation of women as well as its reluctance to acknowledge women as a fanbase with valid opinions.

(Re)Connecting the Pop: The Hunger Games, Election 2012, Ray Bradbury, The Avengers

Art by Faith Erin Hicks

Revisiting some of the pop culture topics covered here over the past few months by way of sharing some related links that get at media literacy, visual literacy, and transliteracy.

Guest Post by Maria Selke: Harnessing Fandom to Teach the Hero’s Journey

hero_1000

I’ve always been proud of my fandom, but I’m even more thrilled that it is a powerful tool for instruction in my classroom.

Why We Respond to “Chronicle” – Part 2: Found Footage and Narrative Immersion

He crumples the car without touching it... similarly, we live out our dark desires on the screen without being on the screen. (image courtesy of Fox)

A connection with the point-of-view character sometimes isn’t made because words and ideas somehow get in the way of immediacy rather than reinforcing it. So when we attempt to show the cost of not appreciating literature by referencing the beauty and profundity of those words and ideas, we’re possibly compounding the problem…

Why We Respond to “Chronicle” – Part 1: Anne Frank’s Vlog

A sad and lonely teen who has reasons to be sad if not lonely... where have we heard this story before?

We spy on these characters, we travel alongside them like a second, invisible yet all-seeing head on their shoulders, we peer inside their skulls, and later we say we “identified” with them as if that’s something they would have wanted…