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Heavy Medal: A Mock Newbery Blog
Inside Heavy Medal

Online Mock Newbery

UnknownWe’re doing things a bit differently this year then we have in years past.  Rather than having people post their votes in the comments, we are using an online ballot and you can vote here.  We dithered between two rounds, but opted for a decisive single one.  Voting will close on Friday night, so get those votes in early!

You’ll notice that we’ve doubled the size of the shortlist, from 9 to 18.  I’m hoping that some of you will take advantage of this time to lobby for some of these very deserving books that didn’t make the previous shortlist.

 

 

 

 

AS BRAVE AS YOU

BEFORE  MORNING

THE BEST MAN

FULL OF BEANS

FREEDOM IN CONGO SQUARE

GHOST

THE GIRL WHO DRANK THE MOON

THE INQUISITOR’S TALE

JUANA & LUCAS

MARCH, BOOK THREE

PAX

RAYMIE NIGHTINGALE

SAMURAI RISING

SOME WRITER!

WHEN GREEN BECOMES TOMATOES

WHEN THE SEA TURNED TO SILVER

THE WILD ROBOT

WOLF HOLLOW

 

 

 

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Jonathan Hunt About Jonathan Hunt

Jonathan Hunt is the Coordinator of Library Media Services at the San Diego County Office of Education. He served on the 2006 Newbery committee, and has also judged the Caldecott Medal, the Printz Award, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. You can reach him at hunt_yellow@yahoo.com

Comments

  1. Leonard Kim says:

    I am glad to see THE INQUISITOR’S TALE and THE GIRL WHO DRANK THE MOON on the ballot! That said, it saddens me to leave one of these two books off my ballot. This is a case where I’d have loved to have a second round of voting after gauging support.

    I’ve already declared my love for THE GIRL WHO DRANK THE MOON before, but I want to say a few words in support of the THE INQUISITOR’S TALE because in a previous post I was one of the people who appeared to damn it with faint praise. Yes I have a few quibbles about Gidwitz’s pure writing chops, but everything else bends to greatness. I want to specifically mention that Gidwitz’s treatment of all the subcriteria: characters, plot, setting, style, theme, information, “pays forward” — prepares young readers to eventually (and perhaps with a thrill of recognition) read Chaucer and the Bible and, oh, Dante and Milton and so forth. Other books may be mirrors or windows but THE INQUISITOR’S TALE could open eyes to our deep (yes yes dead white male) literary heritage and the relevance of that literature. Yet its take is novel – it’s a “contribution to American literature” not a rehash. And on top of that, it’s still a funny, expressive, rip-roaring read. While I think there are several better-written books amongst contenders and non-contenders, for “quality of presentation for children I think this is a top 2 book.

  2. Leonard, the final spots on our ballots may cancel each other out then! :) Because I’m leaning toward THE INQUISITOR’S TALE. I agree with you, there are times that the writing is not near as lyrical as other contenders, but the sheer amount of work that went into crafting the story is what is compelling me. PAX and WHEN GREEN BECOMES TOMATOES are my favorites, but FULL OF BEANS, THE INQUISITOR’S TALE, and THE GIRL WHO DRANK THE MOON are battling for that final spot.

  3. I’ve marked my ballot (an enthusiastic vote for Wolf Hollow and a pleased-to-support nod for As Brave as You), but I just finished Cloud and Wallfish – and I would have voted for it if it had been on the list.

    Anne Nesbet has a lot of balls in the air with this book. She’s recounting history, explaining sociology (those parents!), telling a fairy tale, – all wrapped up in an unpredictable narrative with characters who demand the reader’s attention. So well done.

    (And I am still rooting for All Rise for the Honorable Perry T. Cook!)

  4. Kate McCue-Day says:

    I went Wolf Hollow, The Inquisitors Tale, The Wild Robot. Talk about three totally different books. This year I read more new books than ever to really be ready and instead I was overwhelmed with trying to make a decision. Ultimately it was that WH has stuck with me for weeks, I thought IT was so cool and expansive and WR just touched my heart. Reasons to vote for them, perhaps not. However as a 5th grade teacher I really always try to think like a kid, if I can. I will say I also loved The Best Man and The Girl who Drank the Moon. Hour of the Bees still remains one of my favorites of the year and one my students love too.

  5. Meredith Burton says:

    I am finally listening to The Girl who Drank the Moon as I just couldn’t wait any longer. I am utterly enchanted! The lyrical writing, complex themes of parenthood and growing up, true family, the need for Hope in the midst of Sorrow and sacrifice! So much to ponder. Antane is my favorite character so far. I love when authors have main characters with physical imperfections. I love Zan as well because, like all parents, she makes mistakes but is still determined to protect her foster child. I love the first-person chapters and the non-linear framework.
    There is so much beautiful reading for children this year. The committee has their work cut out for them I’m sure! Thanks for this blog. It’s so much fun to hear others’ opinions.

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