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Heavy Medal: A Mock Newbery Blog
Inside Heavy Medal
Roxanne Hsu Feldman

About Roxanne Hsu Feldman

Roxanne Hsu Feldman is the Middle School (4th to 8th grade) Librarian at the Dalton School in New York City. She served on the 2002 and 2013 Newbery Committees. Roxanne was also a member of 2008-2009 Notable Books for Children, 2015 Best Fiction for Young Adults, and the 2017 Odyssey Award Committees. In 2016 Roxanne was one of the three judges for the Boston Globe-Horn Book Awards. You can reach her at at roxannefeldman@gmail.com.

May Suggestions, May We?

Dear Heavy Medal Readers, we hope you have discovered many worthy titles thus far, please – Suggest books that might have a chance to contend for the Newbery.  A Suggestion means: “this could be a contender, maybe…”, but doesn’t have to mean: “This is definitely a top Newbery possibility.” – Please only suggest eligible books. […]

Monthly Reader Suggestions: March – April, 2019

Some titles have garnered strong Heavy Medal reader support and our list is growing! Thank you, readers of new children’s books and of the Heavy Medal blog. We’ll see you again in early May for another round of suggestions. Please comment and let us know if you see anything missing! New Kid Craft 13 Pay […]

April Suggestions – No Joke!

Thank you all for the suggestions in March.  We’re asking for your input of more titles to put on everyone’s radar. (A word on the selection of featured cover here: it does not mean an endorsement, only a title that has garnered some critical praises that is eligible for suggestion.) Please: – Suggest books that […]

Final Call for Heavy Medal Readers Poll

287 Heavy Medal readers voted. 127 of you are new Heavy Medal Readers and 160 are returning readers. Here are the results: The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge: 22 (7.7%) The Book of Boy: 24 (8.4%) The Faithful Spy: 5 (1.7%) Front Desk: 37 (12.9%) The Girl Who Drew Butterflies: 4 (1.4%) Hey, Kiddo!: 26 (9.1%) The […]

2019 Heavy Medal Award Winner Announcement

After two more rounds (via email and ballot forms) of voting, the 2019 Heavy Medal Award Committee finally came to consensus and picked the winning title published for children in 2018.  We are excited and thrilled to announce that the 2019 Heavy Medal Award goes to Jonathan Auxier for his moving historical fantasy Sweep: The Story of a Girl […]

2019 Heavy Medal Award — Reader Poll

Readers, stay tuned.  We are still in the process of our Third (and might not be the Last) Round of Balloting. As evident from yesterday’s whirlwind of comments (more than two hundred before we closed the comments for the two posts,) our 17 Heavy Medal Award Committee members are taking this task of picking a […]

2019 Heavy Medal Award – Second Ballot Results

This are the results of our second round of voting. A few more books are OFF the table: Front Desk, Just Like Jackie, The Night Diary, Poet X (This one kills me!), and Small Spaces.  So, we are left with the following titles to further examine: [The Assassination of Brangwain Spurge] First x 3 Second x 1 […]

And the Heavy Medal Award Winner Is…. (not yet)

Last night, all 17 members of the Heavy Medal Award Committee cast our votes for the first time.  And we have not yet selected a winner. Here are the guidelines to determine a winning title. A. Each member must cast three separate votes.  One each for First Place, Second Place, and Third Place. B. A First Place […]

Heavy Medal Finalist: HEY, KIDDO by Jarrett J. Krosoczka

HEY KIDDO by Jarrett J. Krosoczka is today’s Heavy Medal Finalist. Heavy Medal Committee member Mary Zdrojewski points out that “The dialogue all feels natural, and each line reveals more about the character speaking it. Even portions that don’t seem essential to the plot deepen the characters so that no line is wasted.”

Heavy Medal Finalist: THE GIRL WHO DREW BUTTERFLIES by Joyce Sidman

Today’s Heavy Medal Finalist is THE GIRL WHO DREW BUTTERFLIES. Heavy Medal Committee member Susan N. introduces the book, noting how “poet Joyce Sidman elegantly uses the stages of insect development as a metaphor for the transformation of a woman and of the world around her.”