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How would you fill an Edcanvas?


I am adding Edcanvas to my toolkit for curating, flipping, and presenting. The flexible platform allows teachers and students to organize and share teaching and learning materials, or their research products, in the form of a attractive visual grids composed of tiles. Pick a topic, choose a theme (tile layout) and create a canvas by […]

Pew offers new Libraries page


I was about to write an alert about several of the interesting new Pew Internet & American Life Project studies, when I discovered that it is now easier to discover those studies. The Pew Project recently added a Libraries page to their site, gathering research especially relevant to our community, as well as updates from […]

Sticky research metaphors?


This holiday weekend I bumped into a former student at the mall.  And she said, Thank you, Dr. V., for the metaphors. I’ve been keeping them in mind at college. When I looked at her puzzled, she reminded me of a couple of the goofy things I regularly say to make teenage sense of the […]

Wikipedia and JSTOR partner


In a Wikimedia blog post this week, Steven Walling shared news of an exciting partnership. JSTOR, that non-profit consortium-based database, beloved by high school and college students everywhere for its scholarly, authoritative content, will now provide the 100 most active Wikipedia editors with free access to the complete archive collections on JSTOR, including more than […]

New from Pew: How Teens do Research in the Digital World


This morning, the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project released How Teens Do Research in the Digital World. This one really speaks to the need for digital literacy skills and the type of instruction we are all about. Conducted by Pew, in collaboration with the College Board and the National Writing Project, the […]

Rutgers’ RIOT & other infolit tutorials


Rutgers University’s RIOT (Research Information Online Tutorial) is a sweet suite of five animated and interactive information literacy modules. Our friendly host Kate is just about to graduate from library school and needs to train you to take her tutoring position in the library.  You’ll have to  help some animated college students with a series […]

New tricks for academics


I am kind of excited about the changes I’ve been noticing in academic search. Subscription databases rock, no question about that. And they will likely be the best starting point for the full-text needs of scholars young and old. But new academic search options are appearing as real players, reaching beyond search as location and […]

Twiplomacy and tools for social network research


A couple of years ago, while our students were engaged in a Middle East peace simulation, we discovered that Benjamin Netanyahu tweeted.  In fact, we discovered that at least three folks who called themselves Benjamin Netanyahu were tweeting. Once we distinguished the real Bibi from the imposters, the students representing him were golden. They were […]

New info-infographics from EasyBib & Turnitin


Over the past couple of weeks, two companies released informative information literacy infographics. 1. EasyBib shared You are What You Write which revealed: Students don’t always outline, they like citation management tools, and they tend to procrastinate when writing research projects. Plagiarism is on the rise, according to an iParadigms/Turnitin study. Of the ten most […]

From Syracuse a new video (and compelling research)

Ruth Small, Dave Lankes, and Barbara Stripling appear in this brief and effective video, presenting the value of school libraries and school librarians to learners.  New York Schools Need School Libraries presents these (slightly paraphrased) arguments: Ruth: Even when controlling for poverty level, elementary students in schools with full-time certified librarians had significantly higher ELA […]