Follow This Blog: RSS feed
Neverending Search
Inside Neverending Search

Four Moves and a Habit to share with your middle and high school learners

I’ve never been a fan of evaluation checklists. They require serious cognitive lift, perhaps more lift than some content actually deserves. I am a big fan of what Mike Caufield calls moves, some sticky strategies we can all use to get closer to the truth. Caufield, of Washington State University Vancouver, leads the Digital Polarization […]

John Green launches Crash Course: Navigating Digital Information

On behalf of my library/educator colleagues, thank you, John Green. Thank you, John, for offering us a new tool in introducing media literacy and credibility awareness with our learning communities. Thank you for lending your honest voice and passion to this mission. John recently introduced a new 10-episode Crash Course series, Navigating Digital Information, developed […]

Negotiating Nuance

Recently, I was honored to be invited to speak at the 21CLHK Conference in Hong Kong. One of my archived talks addressed the Noah principle–why predicting rain doesn’t count, and why building arks does–as it relates to the credibility crisis or the challenges of container collapse. I see so many opportunities for us to take […]

On student scrutiny: two strategies

We’re focusing a lot of attention these days of helping students determine credibility. For many of us, this is not a hot new topic. I dug around a bit and dusted off a couple of tools that, I think, stand the test of time.  You are welcome to make copies and retool them for you […]

Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world

We were guaranteed a free press,  We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state.  We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. But it has always been up to the reader or viewer to make […]

Media/news literacy resources too good to miss!

If you read this blog at all, you know I am a fan of Katherine Schulten’s posts for the New York Times Learning Network. This morning she outdid herself with a round-up of resources entitled: Skills and Strategies|Fake News vs. Real News: Determining the Reliability of Sources, in honor of News Engagement Day, coming up […]

Not just about citing images (so much more to embed from NoodleTools!)

A Guide to Citing Images, a new infographic from our friends at NoodleTools, offers a MLA-aligned flow chart to guide researchers through a variety of image citation situations.  But it is not just about image documentation. It asks learners to ask themselves a few important questions before using and documenting images that were born digital.   […]

Thinking about credibility and about Turnitin’s SEER: The Source Educational Evaluation Rubric

I’ve not been a huge fan of listy/form type evaluation tools.  So much of the process of assessing credibility has to do with context. Black and white decisions and rules of thumb are far more fuzzy in a read/write, citizen journalist, open scholarship, media-rich web. Truth is, I often find value in casually published, unvetted […]

Four tools for determining web cred

Not all information tasks are the same.  And because sources that may be perfect for analyzing Hamlet’s motivation, may not be right for examining what’s happening now in Damascus or how far down we might fall from the fiscal cliff, learners need new credibility assessment strategies. As teachers and librarians we are used to discussing […]

EasyBib’s New Extensions: two/too “easy buttons”?

This past week, in its Educator Blog, EasyBib announced its Chrome Toolbar Extension, available for free download in the Chrome Web Store. Essentially, the tool allows users to do two things: Automatically cite web sites with one click using the EasyBib Toolbar. Receive advice on the credibility of the web site you’re citing. The toolbar extension […]