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Isn’t it time to stop Wikipedia shaming?

I am currently working on a research project with partners from the University of Florida and OCLC. Researching Students’ Information Choices (RSIC), our IMLS-funded study, uses simulated Google result lists to examine what happens when student researchers make real-time search engine result page decisions. I thought I’d share some of our preliminary findings. This post […]

Four Moves and a Habit to share with your middle and high school learners

I’ve never been a fan of evaluation checklists. They require serious cognitive lift, perhaps more lift than some content actually deserves. I am a big fan of what Mike Caufield calls moves, some sticky strategies we can all use to get closer to the truth. Caufield, of Washington State University Vancouver, leads the Digital Polarization […]

John Green launches Crash Course: Navigating Digital Information

On behalf of my library/educator colleagues, thank you, John Green. Thank you, John, for offering us a new tool in introducing media literacy and credibility awareness with our learning communities. Thank you for lending your honest voice and passion to this mission. John recently introduced a new 10-episode Crash Course series, Navigating Digital Information, developed […]

On information privilege and information equity

I’ve been doing quite a bit of thinking about the high school/college transition these days and the differences we see among members of the freshman class. Such thinking leads naturally to a consideration of more profound issues of social justice and equity, issues supported by our Common Beliefs and standards. Access to an effective school library program […]

Project Information Literacy News Study: A new study on new adults and news

For this generation, news is social, visual, and fast. News is often overwhelming,  and it can be difficult for students to tell what news is true and what is false. While most students think news is important to democracy, they do not define news by traditional standards, nor do they necessarily assign authority based on the […]

A little help from our academic friends: Five fine portals for instructional fodder

Need a little inspiration for the coming school year?  How about a few fresh strategies for energizing your information literacy instruction and preparing your secondary learners for their academic experience? A number of portals offer training and instruction for our students as well as a little retooling for us as professionals, all aligned with the […]

Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? (Free webinar!)

I am delighted to participate in a free webinar next week that reaches across libraryland. Fake News or Free Speech: Is There a Right to be Misinformed? will be a live session at ALA Annual this summer, but we’re presenting a preview on Wednesday, April 25 courtesy of the Freedom to Read Foundation and the Office of […]

A video visit with your academic librarian: an idea for your seniors

One of my exceptional former students, Lawrence (NJ) High School librarian Ewa Elliot, hosted a meeting a couple of weeks back. She invited middle and high school, public and academic librarians to have a conversation about Ewa scheduled time for us to chat about: our current programs across the board preparing students for life after […]

Negotiating Nuance

Recently, I was honored to be invited to speak at the 21CLHK Conference in Hong Kong. One of my archived talks addressed the Noah principle–why predicting rain doesn’t count, and why building arks does–as it relates to the credibility crisis or the challenges of container collapse. I see so many opportunities for us to take […]