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Nonfiction Matters
Inside Nonfiction Matters

The Hard Part of Blogging at Year’s End

Ebb and Flow

I like blogging, and the more I do it, the more I get used to the rhythm of it — what is a blog, as opposed to a conversation or an article. But this time of year also shows the limitation of blogging. Because a blog is a kind of midpoint between work, thought, and the wide world. It is this moment’s crystalization of some issue, some theme, some concern, some observation, that has come up in regular life. And just now, between Xmas and New Years, regular life changes. Almost all publishing companies are on some form of vacation. Schools are closed. Libraries are filled — a great place to take the kids on these cold days with no school — but that does not necessarily bring any issues to mind that I feel compelled to share with all of you. True, the big, big picture wheels are slowly turning — we’ve had the Boston Globe/HB awards; NBA; the YALSA finalists have been announced; Nina and Jonathan and others have discussed Newbery, Sibert, Caldecott and the rest — and midwinter looms. And those of us who have books coming out in 2010 can’t wait for the next season to start. But right now, even as we feel the shadow of Midwinter and the looming dawn of the new year — it is a time of silence, of quiet, of pause.
    Maybe this is it — in the pause of work, many of us are focused on family — holidays, gifts, gatherings, vacations — all of which have their own dramas, highs, lows, intensities, themes, issues. But rarely do those domestic concerns fit well with a blog like this. Probably many, most, of you are focused on your personal lives now, as am I. So the ebb and flow — the blog as a midpoint between stuff that comes up in my life in kids NF and yours — fades There is less traction, less contact. Less to say. Except, perhaps, that this gap in work, this turning to the family is the touchstone — we meet up with relatives, we see which gizmos and toys are favorites this year, we get a glimpse of kids, uncles, nephews, grandparents we rarely otherwise visit. So maybe this is a time of anthropology, of being participant observers, of gathering insights into young people, reading, entertainment, knowledge, schooling that we will bring back when the world speeds up again, in the New Year.

So friends, what have you learned over the holidays? Any image of our readers, of the parents, kids, family for whom we create books? What insight did Santa bring you?

Comments

  1. Linda Zajac says:

    Since another year has nearly passed, I blogged about time–the time that slips through your fingers as the years melt away, the time necessary to carve and sculpt a piece of writing, and the time and effort that’s not always visible in a published piece. Sigh.

  2. Mira says:

    I always use this time to do research, catch up on my reading and try out my ” theories ” on my own kids.
    When I see the library ” my favorite hideout ” bursting at the seams, I want to say ” why aren’t you kids out having fun ?”

  3. Mira says:

    I always use this time to do research, catch up on my reading and try out my ” theories ” on my own kids.
    When I see the library ” my favorite hideout ” bursting at the seams, I want to say ” why aren’t you kids out having fun ?”

  4. Vicky Alvear Shecter says:

    I also use the extra time to either write or catch up on reading. However, I thought of you and your blog when I read in the news that Amazon sold more kindles than books!!!

  5. marc says:

    seems we are all going in towards family, research, which is the right thing to do at the end of the year.