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Practically Paradise
Inside Practically Paradise

Tech Coaches – Our Friends

Recently I talked about being "lured by the dark side" of technology with library information specialists in New York (see Chris Harris’ blog mention). I was actually referring to the division between technology coaches and library information specialists.

In some districts this is blurred because the LIS is the tech coach. In others there is a strained antagonistic relationship between two groups vying for the power and control of internet/technology resources. In still others the LIS works hand in hand with the tech coach. I don’t know about you, but I choose the third option.

I do love technology and how it can help our students. The reason I haven’t gone over to the dark side is that I love watching the daily impact we have using technology with students more than sharing this with teachers. I am happiest when I can actually do both and work with teachers in my building and throughout districts on practical skills, but I refuse to give up my relationship with students and their immediate learning. 

I happily choose to celebrate the tech coaches of the world including this new tech coach who is blogging about her experiences at http://instructionaltechnology.edublogs.org  I need to remember to send more notes of new technologies and instructional approaches to these tech coaches. They need to hear from us as to what we really need. Check out her article on CAPTIVATE! Cool!

Comments

  1. Carolyn Foote says:

    I think it is unfortunate that these two entities are sometimes at odds. It would be great if some conferences worked on partnerships between librarians and technology coordinators.

    We have much to learn from one another–and working in partnership is so much more constructive for students.

    Unfortunately, sometimes I think that even when librarians have a lot of tech expertise, they end up fighting to be heard. It is the fortunate few who are at campuses where their expertise is equally respected or considered.

    What can we do as librarians to foster those fellowships?