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Someday My Printz Will Come
Inside Someday My Printz Will Come

Did someone say something about egg on faces?

CC-licensed image by Wilheln

This morning we watched the ALA Youth Media Awards livestream (and please, can the stream enter the 21st century? Just a pan shot of the audience/committee members or two, a few interior shots for the Caldecott and Geisel and various illustrator awards? We don’t need much, but something more than the really not-exciting slideshow for the folks at home?).

And we were delighted!

Also, chagrined.

Because oh, how we did not call it!

The Printz Committee recognized the full four possible honor books plus, of course, the winner.

[Read more…]

Decisions, Decisions!

Oh how pleased we are to report that today, you voted and you were decisive!

We ran the total numbers (only 30 voters; everyone else was probably on a plane en route to Dallas, which is where I wish I was headed!) three ways: total voters and points, and then only those who had read all 9 books (5 voters) and again for the 9s and 8s combined (7 voters), just to see if there was any noticeable change based on number of candidates read.

And boy howdy there sure was! [Read more…]

Those pesky numbers

Let’s start off by acknowledging that this data would have gotten me kicked out of statistics class back in grad school days. Our sampling is random, but it might also include far fewer than 114 people, despite the 114 responses: it’s the interwebs, and we have no idea who really voted!

Plus, of our 115 voters, only 6 people definitely read all 10 books, and one of those 6 forgot to actually vote (despite answering how many he or she had read). Then, because of our own lack of thinking this all through, we also don’t even know how many books our first 22 voters read, since that question wasn’t there at first.

And–yes, there’s more!–we had a handful of votes where only first or first and second places were filled out, which skews the data, since a book with dozens of third place votes can outpoint a book with a few first place votes, all else being equal.

So, you know, bad bad data.

But hey, why let that slow us down?

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Round 1 Results, sort of!

Please note: this is a revised version of the post that went up at 2:30 this afternoon.

We will give a more detailed break down of the results with numbers and statistics and complex math shortly, but for now:

A Monster Calls and Chime are vying for the Pyrite medal, but the point spread between them is so narrow that we are doing a second vote. If you’ve read both of titles, please vote in our second poll so that we can declare a clear-cut winner!

Voting ends tonight at 7:30 8:30 PM, Eastern: new deadline based on 7:30 closing resulting in no tiebreak! This is close, but only one book can win. Once we have any sort of conclusion (come on, vote! Get others to vote!) we’ll let you know and post all the rest of the data as well.

Honor vote tomorrow, using the 8 finalists that are not Chime or A Monster Calls plus whichever of those doesn’t win.

Predictions, or, Time to Vote!

CC-licensed image by secretlondon123

Ok, here it is, the moment you’ve all been waiting for.

(Well, we hope you’ve been waiting for it. Possibly with bated breath, or maybe on tenterhooks?)

Below you will find Someday’s short list. We looked at our own reading, other Mock Printz lists, reviews, and more to determine this final list of ten titles that we really think have what it takes to receive a shiny sticker on Monday.

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Books in Brief

I’ve been reading like  madwoman lately, trying to get through any books that anyone I know has mentioned favorably in the context of award getting. I have one more (Brooklyn Burning) that I want to finish and one review from our original contenda list left to post (Beauty Queens), and Sarah’s been working on a pile of her own, so we’ll get all that up this week. But MOSTLY what we’re going to give you this week is a Mock Printz of (y)our own. The list will post tomorrow, and we’ll give until probably midnight Wednesday to vote, and then do honor book polls with the goal to post all results by Saturday, just as the REAL committee is finishing their own discussions, decisions, and votes.

But I’m jumping ahead, because what this post is really about the last minute reading I’ve been doing.

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Mock Printz

CC licensed image by benleto "Coin Operated Crystal Ball"

Over at The Hub, YALSA has a great description of hosting a Mock Printz program. They’ve also got a nice Roundup post.

There are so many enthusiastic, dedicated librarians running these events around the country, it’s really inspiring. We thought we’d find a few more and see what the scattershot results can tell us. Everyone knows, Crystal Balls are polished with spreadsheets made up of Mock Printz results, right?

A lot of places tend to hold their mock events around this time, so we don’t have a ton of results yet. Between the links here and the ones at YALSA, I tried to see which books were getting recognized most often (although this doesn’t necessarily tell us anything about which books will take the Mock Prize and of course doesn’t tell us what will win gold). A Monster Calls comes in with the most nominations at eight. Between Shades of Gray, by my count, got six nods, while Chime and Paper Covers Rock each had five.

Want more details?

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The Book with the Really Long Title about Fairyland and Boats

We’re both a little in love with this book, so you’ll have to bear with not one but two impassioned voices defending its literary value.

So here goes! [Read more…]

Karyn’s 5 Faves from 2011, with some extras

I’m loving all the Top 5’s over at Sarah’s post!

With no further fanfare, here are mine:

Chime: Above and beyond the literary merit, it’s just an awesomely haunting story. We need a name for this kind of book—I group this one with Galen Beckett’s Durrow Street series and a few others. Historical urban fantasy?

The Returning: I know you all know this by now, but I love this one. I fear no one else read it and it’s probably going to go out of print right away so I am just going to keep talking about it until that changes. Please read this and love it too.

Welcome to Bordertown: It’s not a real contenda for the Printz; mixed author anthology, uneven quality, and so on. But it’s important and beautiful, and Bordertown saved me when I was a teen, so I am excited to pass it on to my teens, whether or not they need saving.

The Piper’s Son: Heartbreak, redemption, and don’t you love a love story that isn’t easy? I think that’s one the things Marchetta does better than almost anyone. Love is messy and a comedy of errors (sometimes tragedy) and it doesn’t always go so well. Tom and Tara Finke’s story may be only one element of this novel, but even if I didn’t love the rest of the book, that alone might earn my vote. Plus, Ben and the mullet brothers and Anson Choi.

For my fifth book, I’m going to have to agree with Sarah and say The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland in a Boat of Her Own Making, although the fact that I just finished rereading this one might have artificially elevated it in my rankings. I also considered The FitzOsborne’s in Exile and The Name of the Star and a few others for position five, so clearly there were a great many books I really enjoyed. And in the end, perhaps my fifth fave from 2011 will be one of my Top Five 2011 Books I Haven’t Read Yet But Really Really Want to Read ASAP:

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Under the Mesquite

This was a late addition to our reading pile thanks to the Morris nod and a presence on one of the year-end lists. It’s not an easy book to track down; I struck out at a few bookstores and the local library system (where it is owned but in single digits). But I finally got my hands on it and read it in just a few hours.

And I’m a little underwhelmed. It’s a lovely book, and I think it’s an important one: there are not enough books like this, in which a Mexican-American family lives their life, and the focus is not on assimilation or immigration but on the family, and their duality (Mexican/American, Spanish/English) shapes them but isn’t the whole story by a long shot.

Instead, this is about love and loss and family, important and universal themes.

But it’s thin. [Read more…]