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Someday My Printz Will Come
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Symphony for the City of the Dead

Symphony for the City of the Dead, M.T. Anderson
Candlewick Press, September 2015
Reviewed from ARC

One of my favorite books last year was Candace Fleming’s The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, and the Fall of Imperial RussiaDespite having a ton of critical praise for its tight, thrilling narrative and thoughtful approach to complex history, it didn’t manage to snag a Printz (although it did win lots of other great awards). Symphony for the City of the Dead is, in many ways, a wonderful sequel to Fleming’s book. M.T. Anderson begins Symphony with Dmitri Shostakovich’s childhood, just before the end of the Romanov reign and the rise of Lenin. For the first half of the book he alternates between chronicles of Shostakovich’s life and the political and social upheaval in Russia beginning with the Bolsheviks and the revolution straight into World War II. The siege of Leningrad and the composition of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 7 are the main focus of the rest of the book. Anderson—a two-time Printz honoree—does very good work here but a few things in Symphony may keep the author from earning his third Printz.
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Printzbery, Part 4: Last but Not Least

9780544462229 2The Marvels

I’ve had a busy two days, catching up on a few of the swing books we’ve got on the slate for our in-person Printzbery discussion this weekend. Also a busy few days sniffling and crying since both books are heavy on the feels.

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It’s Historical! (Fiction, that is)

Emperor of Any Place coverPaper Hearts cover

Today, two historical fiction books I’d love to talk to about, both set during World War II (making this an apt post to publish on the first night of Hannukah).

One is a lovely novel in verse that I don’t think has gotten much attention — zero stars, no buzz — but I was deeply touched by it and want to shine a little reflected glory on it by sticking it in the conversation even if it’s so dark of a horse it’s nearly invisible.

The second is a critical darling and I just don’t seem to have read the book everyone is raving about, so I’m eager to hear what others see in this one.

So join me below the fold for Paper Hearts and The Emperor of Any Place.

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Fanfare, YALSA, Times, Oh My!

medal-390549_640What a busy week it’s been!

Monday brought us the release of Horn Book’s Fanfare AND The New York Times’ Notable Children’s Books list.

Wednesday, the YALSA Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults (which I persist in calling ENYA even though I think that never really caught on the way I hoped) shortlist was released.

And today we have the YALSA Morris award short list!

So many fabulous books. Let’s take a look at the surprises.

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Illuminae

illuminaeIlluminae by Aime Kaufman and Jay Kristoff
Knopf Books for Young Readers, October 2015
Reviewed from an ARC

So, confession time: I haven’t finished this book yet. I was originally scheduled for my usual Friday post, and I figured I’d have enough time to get to the last page and type up my thoughts in my usual efficient manner (ha). Only, as often happens, life got in the way, and now that my post is due, I’m writing my review, and I’m also still reading. Multi-tasking talents! I have them!

No, actually — not even a little. But what I can do is write up my impressions so far. Illuminae is (and here’s my rationalization for not having finished) a big book — 599 pages. It’s been awarded three stars since its publication in October, and lots of people are buzzing about it. [Read more…]