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Someday My Printz Will Come
Inside Someday My Printz Will Come

YMA 2018: Liveblog!

Well, we’re here! After all is said and done (and at this point, we’ve done a LOT of saying), we’ve arrived at the moment we’ve all been waiting for. Lots of books, lots of words, lots of passionate debate later, it all comes down to that conference room in Denver. Are you ready??

We’ll have our — well, my — reactions after the jump here in this blog post. We’re covering the teen section of the YMAs, and will be including reactions (and, let’s be honest) a lot of gushing. Comments will be open for conversation, reactions, and debriefing. As always, let’s remember Karyn’s reminder from the picks/predictions post the other day — RealCommittee does the hard work every year. We’re here to respect their work and the process they’ve gone through. Our choice and our thoughts are the result of our own process, which mimics RealCommittee rules and process, but is not actually the same.

This has been a long blogging season this time around, so let’s get to work! [Read more…]

Pyrite Slate, 2018

Red rose on a white background, Wikipedia

Red rose on a white background, Wikipedia

It’s official! We have done it! We named our winner last week, and now we’ve got our honor books. Votes came in, spreadsheets were made, and many other things happened — and it was all done in the passive voice, I guess.

But who can think about grammar, really, when we have a completely fictional award to give out!? Once again, you’ll have to imagine me with Bachelor-ish roses, and an intense close up on my face — and I guess all the authors’ faces, because OF COURSE they would join a reality TV version of the Pyrite, right? — with striking music playing to really heighten the tension. Click through for our slate! [Read more…]

Morris + Printz?

In our frantic dash to the finish line, we’re taking today to look at the Morris finalists. A Morris nod has nothing really to do with the Printz slate, though there’s been overlap in years past. And a lack of a Morris nod doesn’t rule any author out for the Printz, either. They’re not correlative. But here in our little world, as opposed to RealCommittee, we use every tool at our disposal to make sure we’re not missing a title and have been able to spend at least a little time with any book the RealCommittee might be talking about — and there’s been just enough overlap in the past that it’s plausible, even likely, that the RC makes sure they take a peek at anything on the Morris shortlist.

We’ve already covered The Hate U Give (the most likely to overlap this year!) and Saints + Misfits, so today we have the remaining three titles from the Morris shortlist: Starfish, Devils Within, and Dear Martin. None of these were on our reading list prior to the shortlist announcement, because our other, very general marker is three or more stars — and these three all have under 3 stars. As we’ve said before, stars aren’t really a predictor for Printz — it’s just one of the ways we we whittle the list of all YA books down to a reasonable pile. As usual, we’ll be running through the books alphabetically. Ready? Click through for the fun! [Read more…]

Pyrite 2018: It’s Official!


Pyrite/Fool’s Gold from Wikipedia

Last week, we opened the polls for one of our favorite things to do around here: vote for the Pyrite Winner! (Get it? Pyrite? Like not-quite-gold? Because while we read, discuss, and overall mimic RealCommittee’s work, we aren’t RealCommittee? So our medal is sort of an imitation gold sticker? That is in no way a sticker?) And now, a week later, we have a winner!

And, with great relief, I want to tell you that it went differently from last year; we have a clear-cut, easy to call winner (last year we had to go through…how many rounds of voting because things were so close? Two rounds? There was a lot of voting last year, is what I’m saying.)

But we made it through, and after the jump, we’ll get to, you know, THE TITLE THAT WON, and all the delicious numbers and charts and behind-the-scenes breakdown that (some of us) live for.

*drum roll drum roll/intense close up on me as I prepare to hand out our Pyrite Rose.*  [Read more…]

Another Nonfiction Roundup

NonfictionMonday, we got a graphic novel round up. And earlier this year, we had a nonfiction roundup. Now that we’ve reached the end of the year — and seen the Excellence for NF shortlist, and taken a look at all the year-end lists — we’ve got a second round up, taking a look at all the nonfiction titles we’ve been saving. We’ll go through each title alphabetically. [Read more…]

Graphic Novel Roundup

Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 2.41.45 PM

It hasn’t been an outstanding year for graphic format works with Printz potential — but a handful of books either have some buzz or have some potential, even if none of them are likely to be serious contenders. So read on for an alphabetical listing of graphic novels that might maybe could (but probably won’t) have Printzly aspirations.

[Read more…]

Divergent Dystopic Visions

Screen Shot 2018-01-21 at 11.30.26 AMNot Divergent divergent, but diverse, unexpected, small press books diverging from the post-apocalyptic formula of yesteryear: that’s what we’ve got for you today. The Marrow Thieves won both the Kirkus Prize and the Canadian Governor General’s Literary Award, and has shown up on the year-end lists for Kirkus and School Library Journal — not bad for a Canadian publication almost entirely under the radar stateside. All the Wind in the World is Samantha Mabry’s sophomore effort after last year’s enticing A Fierce and Subtle Poison. It’s a quiet book in terms of buzz, although it had a strong showing out of the gate with 3 stars and a place on the NBA longlist; it also made Booklist‘s Editor’s Choice.

[Read more…]

The Book of Dust

Book of Dust coverThis isn’t necessarily a big book in Printz speculation terms, but it’s a big book in the kidlit field; lots of excited librarians, lots of buzzing adults, lots of stars, lots of sales. Which means it’s the kind of book the RealCommittee is likely to look at, and it’s also the kind of book that we all wanted to read, so it was a solid candidate for a round-table review.

But then Joy decided to be a fan and not read this for critique purposes (and really, do you blame her? Sometimes it’s so nice not to worry about what you’ll say about a book). Karyn and Sarah, on the other hand, decided to use the critique to work through our conflicting feelings, so this is only a two-person discussion — but we’re hoping it will become a more-person discussion in the comments. We know some of you will strongly disagree with what we have to say.

[Read more…]


Cover imagesSisters. Parents. Family. Children of immigrants. Starred reviews. National Book Award recognition. These books have quite a bit in common, not least in terms of love and buzz and people talk-talk-talking. Both novels examine generational expectations, both examine daughters who long to be artists, and both novels illustrate how daughters and their parents move around each other in complicated patterns, trying to understand each other. They’re not entirely similar — while Perkins uses different perspectives and voices to tell the story of one family’s experiences, Sánchez focuses on Julia’s voice to give an understanding of her family. Perkins’ You Bring the Distant Near got four stars, and Sánchez’s I Am Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter received two stars. With intense focus from the NBA (YBDN made the longlist; IAMYPMD was a finalist), what will RealCommittee have to say about these two titles?

[Read more…]

More Previous Winners, with a Side of Uh-Oh

Screen Shot 2018-01-09 at 6.09.55 AMTwo books today, both fantasy. All the Crooked Saints technically belonged in last week’s previous winners cluster, as Stiefvater received an honor for 2012’s The Scorpio Races, but it ran over the word count. And That Inevitable Victorian Thing seemed like a good book to pair with it; Johnston, like Stiefvater, loves to play with old stories in new forms, and has a Morris, making her a previous winner — albeit not a Printz winner. Also, both fall into the problematic books from beloved authors category. So with no further introduction, here goes:

[Read more…]