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Someday My Printz Will Come
Inside Someday My Printz Will Come

Looking Ahead to 2018

number 2 Calendar Wood Block number 0 number 1 Colour Bingo green number 8

letter P letter R letter I letter N letter T Scrabble white letter on pale green Z

Scrabble white letter on blue P letter O letter S Scrabble white letter on pale green S letter I Scrabble white letter on pale blue B letter L letter E shain letter S

(Image thanks to Spell with Flickr)

The YMA dust has settled (even if nothing else has, or seems likely to) and so we’re turning our attention to the bright spots of 2017: the books we can’t wait to get our hands on, with special attention for the ones that seem likely to be on the 2018 RealCommittee’s reading list.

I’ve got my to-read shelf already building up of books I’m anticipating, mostly new books by already beloved authors, some of which seem likely Printz potentials.  What’s on your radar? Comments are open: let’s start building our collective reading list.

In the Room Where the Livestream Happens

Screen Shot 2017-01-23 at 8.56.38 AMWhew! The MTA was determined to thwart me this morning, but I made it in just before Julie Todaro took the stage, and I’ve got my livestream running.

(I didn’t mind being #alaleftbehind until this morning, when I felt so frustrated that the world outside ALA doesn’t stop everything for the YMAs!)

Sarah and Joy are still en route to their workplaces, watching while commuting, but they’ll chime in if possible, and I’ll be writing while we watch. YAY YMAs!

(tl; dr: Comments are open so let’s debrief togther! The complete press release can be accessed here.)

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We FINALLY have a Pyrite slate!

pyrite 2017Believe it or not, we started our Pyrite voting eleven days ago. We have finally, FINALLY reached the end of the road though and we have a Pyrite slate!

If you’ve been playing along from the beginning, you know that The Passion of Dolssa emerged victorious from the two rounds of winner voting. After the first round of honor voting, The Lie Tree had a runaway lead over the rest of the books vying for honors, six of which were too close to call. And now, we have three more to add to our slate:

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The Reader

The ReaderThe Reader by Traci Chee
Putnam, August 2016
Reviewed from an ARC

This is a book I’ve been saving the whole season, saving until the end because I knew I’d love it and I wanted to savor it. I’m not alone in loving it — it has four stars, it’s on the SLJ Mothership’s year end list, and it’s fantasy, and there’s action, and there are pirates, and it’s atmospheric and beautiful, and there are magical reading powers, and that cover is so wow, and and AND! What can I say? Sometimes you feel like possibly a book was designed, down to a molecular level, to be a You Book. This is one of those times for me. But now that I’ve actually read it, and sat with it for a bit, I’m going to do my best and try to have a balanced take for our Printzly purposes.

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Pyrite Honor Votes: Results and Decisions

By Materialscientist at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0.

By Materialscientist at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0.

We voted, and we have some results to share!

(Insert boilerplate about how this will be the simple version of the results with analysis to follow when Joy finishes geeking out over the numbers.)

But first, a reminder about honor vote procedures:

Based on the results of this ballot, the committee will decide if it wishes to name honor books and, if so, how many.

We can name up to four Pyrite honor books, per RealCommittee rules, but we don’t have to — last year, the RealCommittee only named two, which was a bold move (usually all four get honored). In my own RealCommittee year, we debated long and hard over how many honor books to name because of the points gap; we’ve seen this in the Pyrite before as well, where there is a clear distinction between the most supported and the least supported of the top four books. We can suss this out in the comments, and decide what we, as a shadow committee, want to name, but to do that you’ll need some numbers. Here they are:

The Lie Tree was the clear frontrunner — no surprise — with 70 75* points (7/5/0/1).

There’s a huge gap before the next group of books, which are pretty tightly clustered, as follows:

We Are the Ants: 35 (2/3/2/0)

Still Life with Tornado: 34 (2/2/3/1)

Scythe: 32 (3/1/1/3)

The Female of the Species: 32 (2/3/1/0)

Just to give a fuller sense of the points spread, March Book 3 just missed the top 4, coming in with 30 points (2/1/3/2), and The Sun is Also a Star had 29 (2/1/3/1); after that there’s another drop down to 22 points.

So, have at it: 1 honor book? 2? 3? Or do we go for the full four? (And if so, how?) Some years this is one of the more difficult choices the RealCommittee makes; let’s do our best to be as thoughtful.

*An earlier version of this post stated that The Lie Tree had 70 points due to a spreadsheet error.

 

Still Life With Tornado

still-life-with-tornadoOh, A.S. King! Every year, a new novel. Every year, a bold move to expand what we think of as a novel. I’m not sure if I’m a King fan, but I find myself drawn to her books year after year because I trust them to be engrossing reading experiences, even if I have an Alice-in-Wonderland feeling the entire time, unsure of what’s real and what’s hallucinatory, unsure where I stand or how to even approach thinking about what’s in front of me.

This year’s offering is pure King — but it’s also accessible in a way we haven’t seen since Ask the Passengers. And I’d argue it’s better than King’s Printz honor-winning Please Excuse Vera Dietz. In short, this one is a true contender.

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Last Licks

There are so many great books, and every year we’re reading until the 11th hour to get in as many as possible. This year, between last minute reads and beloved books that didn’t seem like true contenders but deserve a shout-out, we find ourselves down to the final days before the YMAs with quite a pile left.

So here you have our last licks — not counting our three remaining biggies (Still Life with Tornado, The Reader, and Scythe), this post concludes our 2016 pile of books we still have something to say about. Whew! Nearly there.

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MOAR Morris

morriscoversWhile Morris-Printz crossover isn’t exactly common, it’s happened twice —  in 2012, when Where Things Come Back took the double gold; and again in 2015, with sleeper hit The Carnival at Bray taking double silver.

This season, we pretty much flubbed our Morris coverage; the debuts we covered earlier in the season were largely not the debuts the Morris Committee shortlisted (exception: The Serpent King), and those we “predicted” were notably absent from the shortlist. But failing to predict the Morris is actually pretty true to form for us, as is this post: a last minute roundup of the actual Morris shortlisters, squeaked out shortly before the YMAs.

We are not a Morris speculation site, and the Morris has different criteria than the Printz, so our goal here is not actually to predict the Morris (which we’ll definitely fail to do!) but to look at how these already notable books — some of which were on our radar already — stack up in the larger and more specific Printz pool. Here goes!

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Nonfiction roundup, part 2!

nonfic 2It wouldn’t be January at Someday without roundup review posts galore! I’m nothing if not a stickler for tradition so we’re rolling into hump day with three nonfiction books covering three very different subjects: a man whose story might as well be myth, a complicated and unpopular war, and a pacifist turned spy. If there’s any thread connecting these three books it’s perhaps that none have been short listed for the YALSA nonfiction award, which demonstrates the depth of quality nonfiction for young readers we saw in 2016. With no shot at the nonfiction award, do any of these (appearing below in order of author’s last name) stand a chance at the Printz?
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These Books Have Nothing in Common

screen-shot-2016-12-31-at-2-37-04-pmThat is, these books have nothing in common except their matching star count. But time is short and the books with positive reviews are many, so here we are, lumping them together.

Russo’s If I Was Your Girl was on our list from the very beginning of the year. It’s a love story with a trans main character, and never devolves into a problem novel, which is still relatively refreshing (and oh so welcome) when it comes to trans protagonists.

Kids of Appetite, on the other hand, was a late entry after it started showing up on year-end lists. It features a protagonist with an uncommon medical ailment and a character who maybe functions as a magical negro, and reads like Andrew Smith lite.

Needless to say, I only support one of these as a contender.

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