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Someday My Printz Will Come
Inside Someday My Printz Will Come

Another Year-End List, with STATS!

my stats Another Year End List, with STATS!

This is how I do statistical analysis. There's a better way, right?

The Kirkus list posted yesterday, and it’s a whopper: a full 100 books.

Happily, since we’re talking 100, I can do some statistical analysis!

We had 42% of the books on the Kirkus list on our own contender list from the beginning — that’s not yet half, but more than a third, which is not a bad overlap.

(I’m not listing all 42 titles, though.)

An additional 7% of the list are on our unofficial list of books we will cover if we can get them read in time — two for their Morris nods (Wonder Show and Love and Other Perishable Items), one for multiple Pyrite write-ins (In Darkness), and four because we’ve been hearing things (See You at Harry’s, Enchanted, although I started that and felt a bit meh, The Broken Lands, and Vessel).

We’re also adding two more to our unofficial list now, since Kirkus marks the second year-end recognition for Drama (also on the PW list) and My Name is Parvana (also on the SLJ list).

A further 11% of the list are books that one or more of us have already read and didn’t think rated a post. We don’t disagree that that these are (or at least could be argued as being) in the top 100 of the year, but we felt these were not close enough to the top of the pile to merit the extra time. That said, they might find their way into a post eventually, time permitting.

Of the remaining 38%, I see a fair number of series books, many of them books with a strong fan base but which no one is reading except as part of the larger body of work and which, statistically speaking, are such Printz longshots that they aren’t worth covering here. We’ll call the rest dark horses, and see if we see them again or if they are just outliers.

Thoughts?

Stars vs. Printz: Round One!

So, starred reviews and the Printz award. We’re going to cover this topic in at least two posts this year, so whatever I don’t address (or get dead wrong), Karyn will cover in a couple of weeks!

I’m a visual, list-making sort of person, so as I mulled over this topic this week, I found myself making a mental chart of how they relate, in terms of their functions as well as how they’re determined.

[Read more...]

Stop Playing Games with My Heart (More Best Lists)

stacks 300x225 Stop Playing Games with My Heart (More Best Lists)This week brought us not one but two great lists!

On Monday, Kirkus Reviews posted the Best Teen Books of 2011, and it was FULL of surprises. Surprises in the whoops, I missed that book entirely category, so color me chagrined (I imagine it a sort of blush color, to suit the physical manifestation of the emotion).

I’m consoling myself with the repeated mantra of “Best and Printz are not the same.” They’re not mutually exclusive, but the overlap can be slim depending on how best is defined and given that the Printz Award goes to one book and an honor goes to no more than four books; whereas we can have hundreds of books defined as best in a list (although usually not more than 100 on any single list).

And then, on Thursday, we finally got the full School Library Journal list! Which was happily less full of surprises.

[Read more...]

Kirkus Children’s!

Usually, I am annoyed/aggravated/inclined to roll my eyes at the casual way we use “children’s” to mean birth to 18 (see: most publishing houses). Also, the cavalier dismissal of differences between science fiction and fantasy (they’re not the same. Really. But that’s immaterial right now). Today, however, I was instead sad to find that the tweet (see right) that had me all excited to click through really did mean children’s in the sense of up to age 12 (we won’t get the teen list until 11/28). Picture 1 300x96 Kirkus Childrens!

Boo.

But!

I did notice that three titles that have come up as stuff we should/might/could talk about in the context of a mock Printz or at least teen readers are on the list: The Floating Islands by Rachel Neumeier, Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos, and Okay for Now by Gary Schmidt.

So, did Kirkus put these in the right place? Would they be better served on the teen list? Are these contendas in any way? And did you even read The Floating Islands, which I loved and didn’t find particularly young at all?