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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Review of the Day: Wink by Rob Harrell

They say, write what you know. And if what you know is how to lie on a steel table, your head screwed into place, a laser pointed at your face, that might be a good place to start. We live in dark times. How dark are they? SO dark that a book about a kid with a potentially deadly eye cancer is the bit of lighthearted levity we all need and crave.

Review of the Day: Nerp! by Sarah Lynne Reul

You know those parents that get roped into reading to their kids’ preschool/Kindergarten/church group and walk aimlessly through libraries and bookstores in a hazy daze of barely contained fear? This book is for them. Guaranteed laughs, short content, and the kind of book I could see a kid demanding over and over again. Worth buying? “Yerp!”

Review of the Day : We Are Power by Todd Hasak-Lowy

You don’t need to be a president or a military leader to change the world. Anyone can do it but it takes faith and numbers. It takes smarts and skills and morals. And what it really takes is a knowledge of history. Of what works and what doesn’t. It takes this book. Now hand it to someone who needs it.

Review of the Day: Fighting Words by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley

Not every 12-year-old is going to be ready for the abuse and pain addressed in Bradley’s latest. But for those kids that want a book can be honest with them about the world, written at their age-level, with funny parts and a happy ending where things get better, this is that book. It ain’t easy but it’s there for you.

Review of the Day: Desert Girl, Monsoon Boy by Tara Dairman, ill. Archana Sreenivasan

I honestly think there’s a value in teaching kids the fact that the more you learn, the more you will realize just how much you do not know. That there’s always room for more knowledge. And Desert Girl, Monsoon Boy is a gorgeously wrought, simply written, smart story that does the work of engaging and informing kids alongside their ill-informed parents.

Review of the Day: All of a Sudden and Forever by Chris Barton and Nicole Xu

If we are talking about events that change us all and that we must collectively heal from (whether literally or figuratively) then this book might be precisely what we need. Because this isn’t just a book about something that happened a quarter of a century ago. It’s a book that is meant to help you learn how to heal and recover and hope in the face of the horrendous. Give it a go.

Review of the Day: Shirley & Jamila Save Their Summer by Gillian Goerz

Firmly rooted in reality, the book tips its hat low to Sherlock Holmes but maintains an originality entirely of its own. Surely kids won’t be asking for more of the same? They most certainly will. And don’t call me Shirley.

Review of the Day: Ways to Make Sunshine by Renée Watson

Sharp and smart. Kind and caustic. Occasionally acidic, but in a nice way, today’s review is of the kind of book that wakes up dreamy readers and forces the darned kids to think a little. Precisely what we would have all been waiting for, had we but known to want it.

Review of the Day: Outside In by Deborah Underwood, ill. Cindy Derby

Right now, in the Spring, when the world seems scary, this may be the comforting book about what’s beyond our back doors that we all need right now.

Review of the Day: Fly On the Wall by Remy Lai

Behold a story that runs, caterwauls, spies, sneaks, rides, and generally has a wonderful time. This is a book I can’t show my colleagues at work because my 8-year-old won’t let it out of her sight. A fairly high bit of praise, if I do say so myself.

Review of the Day: Snail Crossing by Corey R. Tabor

I’ve read snail picture books before, but few have plumbed their humor quite as well as Tabor has in “Snail Crossing”. Less a story of persistence than a lesson in karma, this may well be the first snail-adjacent picture book that has ever made me AND my kids laugh out loud for long periods of time. I can think of not better praise than that.

Review of the Day: A Little Called Pauline by Gertrude Stein with Bianca Stone

I’ve no doubt that there will be plenty of folks out there that take one look at its simple cover, flip through, scoff, and set it down. More fool they. If you want a book that gives your children raw, unblemished poetry in a form they CAN’T understand and love NOT understanding, this is the book for them.

Review of the Day: Overground Railroad by Lesa Cline-Ransome and James Ransome

No series of rote facts, Overground Railroad puts you in the shoes of the ordinary people that had to leave everything and everyone they knew in search of a better life. Historical events like The Great Migration are vague. This book hands young readers not just specifics. It hands them people they can get to know and care about.

Review of the Day: Echo Mountain by Lauren Wolk

Hand this to the kid that yearns for that freedom. For wide-open spaces and mysterious figures hiding in the shadows and snot nosed brothers and lots and lots of puppies. Hand it to someone who needs their own mountain. Even if it’s just a literary one.

Review of the Day: Rita & Ralph’s Rotten Day by Carmen Agra Deedy, ill. Pete Oswald

Taking a common hand rhyme and turning it into a story with a satisfying plot would be a difficult challenge for anyone but for Ms. Carmen Agra Deedy’s Rita & Ralph’s Rotten Day it’s a breeze. A marvelous addition to any storytime roster, no matter where you are.