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A Fuse #8 Production
Inside A Fuse #8 Production

Walking and Talking with . . . Grace Lin!

Steve Sheinkin is back with his beloved series!  If you’re unfamiliar with it, Steve has a conversation with an author of books for kids or teens and then plucks from it the best parts.  So in spite of the fact that he has a brand new book out in early 2017 (Undefeated: Jim Thorpe and the Carlisle Indian School Football Team) he still took time to give us this great discussion with Grace Lin.  For the full list of interviews, see the links at the bottom of this post.

Enjoy!

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Catch up with the whole series!

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About Elizabeth Bird

Elizabeth Bird is currently the Collection Development Manager of the Evanston Public Library system and a former Materials Specialist for New York Public Library. She has served on Newbery, written for Horn Book, and has done other lovely little things that she'd love to tell you about but that she's sure you'd find more interesting to hear of in person. Her opinions are her own and do not reflect those of EPL, SLJ, or any of the other acronyms you might be able to name. Follow her on Twitter: @fuseeight.

Comments

  1. I love this series so, so much.

  2. Loved these interviews!! I wonder if they’ll be collected in a book :)

  3. I spent some time driving Grace Lin around several years ago during one of our and I have to say is simply one of the nicest people ever. (and she’s right–it’s usually us and not the kids)

  4. My kids and I just finished reading the Mountain Meets the Moon series together– we all loved it so much. I laugh at the last panel because it’s so true– to kids it’s not some wholesome “multicultural” thing, it’s just fantastic stories. Someone was asking my son the other day about what we were reading and I was prompting him to give the person more details, and I was like “What country does it take place in?– I mean the real country the imaginary country is based on?” and he gave me a weird look and said, “What do you mean what country?” We’d talked about the cultural details in the story, but they barely registered with him as something “different.”