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Someday My Printz Will Come
Inside Someday My Printz Will Come

Exit, Pursued by a Bear

exitExit, Pursued by a Bear by E.K. Johnston
Dutton, March 2016
Reviewed from a final copy

I’m not for sure where I’m landing in this review, so I guess I’ll have to write it and see where I end up. Ha, I guess I’m flying right now, and I’m hoping this review (or you all, in the comments) will catch me. I definitely loved this book, and feel like it’s continuing my tough lady reading streak this year. With four starred reviews, I know I’m not alone in that love. Johnston is a past Morris honoree, too, so I have no doubt RealCommittee is taking a careful look at this title. Exit is emotional and compelling, it has strong characters, often funny dialogue, and as a story it balances uncertainty and resolution very delicately and deftly. [Read more…]

The Memory of Light

Memory of Light, coverThe Memory of Light, Francisco X. Stork
Arthur A. Levine Books, January 2016
Reviewed from ARC

How can I assess The Memory of Light in the context of the Printz Award?

In some ways, it’s too real, too honest, and too close-to-home. It’s also surprisingly uninteresting and predictable. I struggled with these contradictory reactions throughout the novel.

When I read YA books that romanticize depression or mental illness, I want to tear down the Internet with my frustration. Yet this novel, which is so accurate in portraying the complexity of depression, does not inspire me to erect monuments. I don’t mean to be facetious, but this book made me feel nothing at all.

[Read more…]

The Radiant Road

The Radiant Road coverThe Radiant Road, Katherine Catmull
Dutton, January 2016
Reviewed from final e-book

I mentioned last week that each of us has to assess excellence for ourselves, as well as coming to consensus when it comes time to pick a winner (or, for us, Pyrite winner).

For me, excellence is deeply tied to language. I was an English major; I’ve been know to read poetry for fun. I love puns. It doesn’t have to be highfalutin’, but show me real skill manipulating language and I’m likely to be lined up reaching for that book with both hands.

So no surprise, my second book this season once again is one that hits it out of the park when it comes to pure old-fashioned word-smithing.

[Read more…]

The V-Word

v-wordThe V-Word: True Stories about First-Time Sex edited by Amber J. Keyser
Simon Pulse, February 2016
Reviewed from final copy

So this year, I’m starting out with what I can only describe as the “out of left field contender of my heart.” I thought this would be a quick read that I’d be able to check off and move on from — maybe doubling it up with another title here. What can I say — I don’t always like stuff that’s shorter, and nonfiction is only sometimes my jam. And we’ve talked before about how it can be difficult to assess — and especially come to consensus on — anthologies and other mixed-author works. Working through each essay individually and then evaluating as a whole is hard enough on your own; persuading 10 other committee members to vote for an anthology can get tricky. So this is maybe also a shot-in-the-dark contender, but there’s so much that hits perfectly that I just can’t let it alone.   [Read more…]

We Are the Ants

We Are the Ants, Shaun David Hutchinson
Simon Pulse, January 2016
Reviewed from final copy

Have aliens been abducting Henry Denton since he was thirteen? Or has he been suffering from mental illness? Some days I believe the former; other days, the latter. But does it really matter?

Probably not.

We Are the Ants is about much more than the end of the world (although those doomsday scenarios were highly entertaining). Shaun David Hutchinson uses science fiction elements to get at themes that are highly realistic: grief, guilt, love, nihilism… actually, this book is packed with ideas and Hutchinson weaves them through a story in which the protagonist is largely passive.
[Read more…]

Anna and the Swallow Man

anna-swallowAnna and the Swallow Man, Gavriel Savit
Knopf, January 2016
Reviewed from ARC

For the first posted coverage of the season, I thought I’d start with one of the earliest publication dates on our list. Anna and the Swallow Man came out in January. It had huge pre-publication push; we received at least 4 copies just to the school Joy and I work at, at least one of which was in a lovely paper slip cover. And it picked up three stars out of the gate (HB, The Bulletin, and PW): not a bad opening to the year. So does it live up to the hype or the buzz?

[Read more…]

The List, Abbreviated

Photo by Flickr user List_84, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Photo by Flickr user List_84, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Traditionally, we’ve launched the season with our massive (like, 90 titles long) reading list, but when we open with the big list, we always end up regretting approximately one-third of the titles.

So this year, we’re going to share a shorter, not even slightly exhaustive list. Here are our top 25 titles, included either because we’ve already read them or because they’ve gotten all the stars (by which I mean 4 or more, marked with an asterisk) or because the author or description have us thinking these are likely to be worth the conversation.

Obviously, we won’t be reviewing only 25 books this season, and we have plenty of books we’ve read that probably won’t go the distance but are certainly worth a conversation and therefore a post. But here’s the 25 we’re most excited to talk about, aphabetized by title because that’s how we’ve been discussing them.

American Girls, Alison Umminger
As I Descended, Robin Talley
The Bitter Side of Sweet*, Tara Sullivan
Blood Red, Snow White, Marcus Sedgwick
Burn Baby Burn*, Meg Medina
Character, Driven*, David Lubar
Every Exquisite Thing, Matthew Quick
Exit, Pursued by a Bear*, E.K. Johnston
Golden Boys*, Sonya Hartnett
The Head of the Saint, Socorro Acioli
Highly Illogical Behavior, John Corey Whaley
The Lie Tree*, Frances Hardinge
The Memory of Light*, Francisco X. Stork
My Lady Jane, Brodi Ashton, Cynthia Hand, and Jodi Meadows
The Passion of Dolssa*, Julie Berry
Railhead, Philip Reeve
The Reader*, Traci Chee
Samurai Rising*, Pamela S. Turner
The Serpent King, Jeff Zentner
The Singing Bones, Shaun Tan
Spontaneous, Aaron Starmer
Still Life with Tornado, A.S. King
Symptoms of Being Human, Jeff Garvin
Unbecoming*, Jenny Downham
We Are the Ants*, Shaun Davis Hutchinson

What would you add? Remove? Actually, let’s play this committee style: these are our nominations thus far. What are yours?

We’ll be back Monday with our first review. Catch you then!

Here We Go!

CC-licensed image by The Meeting Place North, UK

CC-licensed image by The Meeting Place North, UK

Hello! Howdy! Greetings!

Once upon a time, a couple of former Printz committee members were invited to start a blog for SLJ, a YA counterpoint to the always provocative and wonderful Heavy Medal. And thus Someday My Printz, a Printz speculation blog, was born. Five years later, and here we are back again (now with three regular contributors), ready for another season of reading, guessing, opining, and conversing.

As always, we like to start the season by looking back at the official criteria and eligibility guidelines. We’ve discussed these in some depth before — here and here and here and here, and also here, because apparently we had a lot to say. I don’t want to belabor the point, but it’s always worth noting that the official criteria is a loosely written document seemingly designed to allow growth and change in how the Printz Committee defines excellence. (For our part, we each come at our idea of excellence little differently, and we’d love to hear how you all gauge it.)

One of the most wonderful aspects of committee-based awards is that they grow from a constant dialogue about excellence and from a place of mutual respect. The book I champion won’t necessarily be the one any of you, or Joy, or Sarah, champions. And yet from conversations about each of the nominees, and from close reading and rereading, the committee comes to a consensus each year. And while we (YA librarians, not just the bloggers at Someday) may not always be happy with the decision, the one thing I know from having had the privilege of being in that room for a year is that the decision is always right, even if a different committee could have gotten to a different slate.

So what we do here is not second guessing the amazing, dedicated librarians on the RealCommittee; instead, we try to have a shadow committee, made up of anyone who wants to talk about YA literature and literary excellence, making transparent the kind of in-depth, thoughtful reading the RealCommittee has been engaged in for months already.

Each week we’ll talk about some of this year’s eligible titles, or the conversations around those titles, or other related topics. We’ll do our best to approach the standards of the RealCommittee: close reading, listening to others, considering myriad factors and not relying on emotional responses (although those have a place too). Hopefully, you’ll join the conversation!

So that’s it, the story of where we came from and what we’re doing. Welcome to Someday my Printz Will Come, Year 5! As always, we invite you to join us as we kiss—I mean read!—all the frogs in the pond.

Checking in

slj blog airportIt’s the halfway point of the season, and we’re done sowing our wild oats reading non-2016 and/or non-YA books. We thought maybe if we showed you ours, you’d show us yours? So here’s where we are with our reading. What have you been reading? (And if you went to ALA, we were #ALAleftbehind, so we need you to tell us what ARCS we should be jonesing for.)

Karyn

I have two loves vying for top place in my heart. Both are historical, too. Micro trend? Without further commentary, let me tell you that I adored The Passion of Dolssa by Julie Berry and The Lie Tree by Frances Hardinge.

What I’m looking forward to most: Strange the Dreamer, by Laini Taylor, which doesn’t come out until the fall but patience is a virtue.

Sarah

The love: This isn’t technically teen, but it’s the one that is sticking around inside me — Sonny Liew’s The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye. Art! Creation! History and fictional biography, ambitious storytelling, original and memorable…I’m just listing words at this point, my love is so much.

What I’m reading next: The Serpent King, by Jeff Zentner. Because who doesn’t love a good religious fundamentalist tale?

Joy

I loved We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson (and shhh—this is a secret—I may have loved it more than anything I read in 2015). And because I can’t resist authors with three names, I also just read John Corey Whaley’s Highly Illogical Behavior. Next up is Kiersten White’s And I Darken. A lady Vlad the Impaler? Wha??

What To Read Next: 2017 Award Edition

2 number 0 TSL LOTTO number 1 Bingo Number 7

The season is done, the award has been given, we’ve all gasped and mourned (only two honors!) and celebrated, and finally it’s time to look forward to the 2017 YMAs.

A final thank you to the RealCommittee, whose hard work has given us three excellent choices to talk about and discuss for years to come. And now it’s a new year and there’s a new RealCommittee stepping up and it’s time for us to start reading 2016 books. All this and it’s only January 15th, whoo-hoo!

So let’s have at it: what are you reading/looking forward to/burning to talk about? Comments are open and will stay open, so even though we’re going dark officially*, the fun doesn’t really stop.

XOXO,
Gossip Girl
Karyn, Joy, and Sarah

*We reserve the right to pop up at any point to talk about anything, and especially to update you all with what’s on our radar. But mostly we’ll be dark.

(Image thanks to Spell with Flickr)