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Isn’t it time to stop Wikipedia shaming?

I am currently working on a research project with partners from the University of Florida and OCLC. Researching Students’ Information Choices (RSIC), our IMLS-funded study, uses simulated Google result lists to examine what happens when student researchers make real-time search engine result page decisions. I thought I’d share some of our preliminary findings. This post […]

Four Moves and a Habit to share with your middle and high school learners

I’ve never been a fan of evaluation checklists. They require serious cognitive lift, perhaps more lift than some content actually deserves. I am a big fan of what Mike Caufield calls moves, some sticky strategies we can all use to get closer to the truth. Caufield, of Washington State University Vancouver, leads the Digital Polarization […]

On student scrutiny: two strategies

We’re focusing a lot of attention these days of helping students determine credibility. For many of us, this is not a hot new topic. I dug around a bit and dusted off a couple of tools that, I think, stand the test of time.  You are welcome to make copies and retool them for you […]

Truth, truthiness, triangulation: A news literacy toolkit for a “post-truth” world

We were guaranteed a free press,  We were not guaranteed a neutral or a true press. We can celebrate the journalistic freedom to publish without interference from the state.  We can also celebrate our freedom to share multiple stories through multiple lenses. But it has always been up to the reader or viewer to make […]

Teaching (and writing) with Wikipedia

Alexa lists Wikipedia as the 7th most popular site in the world and the 6th most popular site in the United States. It’s bigger than any encyclopedia we’ve ever before seen.  Everyone uses it. Let’s just say, it’s important. So, doesn’t it make sense to spend a little time helping learners figure out how it […]

Librarians and Danielson and PA

Late last spring, our district distributed the Danielson Framework for Teaching rubric listing the components of instruction–divided into 22 components and 76 smaller elements, and clustered into four domains. Danielson’s Framework, is designed to serve as the the foundation of a school or district’s mentoring, coaching, professional development, and teacher evaluation processes, thus linking all those activities together […]

Not just about citing images (so much more to embed from NoodleTools!)

A Guide to Citing Images, a new infographic from our friends at NoodleTools, offers a MLA-aligned flow chart to guide researchers through a variety of image citation situations.  But it is not just about image documentation. It asks learners to ask themselves a few important questions before using and documenting images that were born digital.   […]

Thinking about credibility and about Turnitin’s SEER: The Source Educational Evaluation Rubric

I’ve not been a huge fan of listy/form type evaluation tools.  So much of the process of assessing credibility has to do with context. Black and white decisions and rules of thumb are far more fuzzy in a read/write, citizen journalist, open scholarship, media-rich web. Truth is, I often find value in casually published, unvetted […]

Four tools for determining web cred

Not all information tasks are the same.  And because sources that may be perfect for analyzing Hamlet’s motivation, may not be right for examining what’s happening now in Damascus or how far down we might fall from the fiscal cliff, learners need new credibility assessment strategies. As teachers and librarians we are used to discussing […]