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The SLIDE Study: A chat with Deb Kachel (Part 2) And exploring the interactive data tools

In my last post, I shared news of the School Librarian Investigation—Decline or Evolution?, or SLIDE research project. The study emphasizes a critical equity issue: our most vulnerable students are those most impacted by a declining numbers of school librarians. I recently chatted with project director, Deb Kachel to dig a little deeper into what […]

SLIDE: data, interactive tools, and an equity wake-up call (Part 1)

We now have the data. Important new research documents concerns relating to the future of our profession and implications for those we serve. The School Librarian Investigation—Decline or Evolution?, or SLIDE research project emphasizes a critical equity issue: our most vulnerable students–those living in poverty, minority populations and English language learners–are those most impacted by […]

Project Information Literacy News Study: A new study on new adults and news

For this generation, news is social, visual, and fast. News is often overwhelming,  and it can be difficult for students to tell what news is true and what is false. While most students think news is important to democracy, they do not define news by traditional standards, nor do they necessarily assign authority based on the […]

Some secret strategies for serious searchers

I designed and currently teach a course called Search and the Information Landscape.  What I love about the course is getting my graduate students to think about their search habits and recognize what works. I also introduce a few classic strategies that have been around in the literature about online searching since the pre-web days. What […]

Ten Chrome Extensions (and a Google Add-On) too good to miss

Over the course of the past couple of years, I’ve become particularly fond of a few Chrome tools that I consider too good to miss.  These would be handy across the board, but especially in Google Classroom and Chromebook environments. Here’s a rundown of nine of my favorite discoveries in no particular order: 1. Google Keep is […]

JournalTOCs and other “pushy” scholarly tools

Here’s a little current awareness tip. But first, a little library history.  In my first library jobs, in special libraries at the Newspaper Advertising Bureau and the Franklin Institute, one of my jobs was to copy and distribute tables of contents from new issues of journals and magazines to the professionals and scientists whose practice […]

Meet CORA (the Community of Online Research Assignments)

Meet CORA, the Community of Online Research Assignments.  My guess is, she’ll become a welcome new friend The open access, collaborative portal facilitates the sharing and adapting of research assignments for faculty and librarians.  While the primary audience is undergraduate and graduate educators, CORA offers a wealth of reliable and reproducible projects–instruction, handouts, scaffolds, rubrics […]

Just released: A Common Sense Census

Common Sense Media just released a major study that will be of interest to any educator interested in understanding how kids actually use technology.  The results make fabulous fodder for faculty discussion.  It may help guide decision making in addressing instruction and issues of equity. The large scale study, Media Use by Teens and Tweens […]

On teens, their phones & shifting communications landscapes (new from Pew)

This week Pew Research Center released Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015, a report that should have relevance to all of us who work with young people.  Unlike Pew’s previous surveys, which involved representative samples of teens interview by phone, this one was conducted online. These data are useful for us in deciding how […]