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A revised manifesto

Thank you all for the kind feedback you offered for my rant a few days back.  As I wrote that response, in the back of my mind I considered a few realities:

1. Some administrators have never seen a vibrant library program.

2. In tough times moving forward is more challenging. Not moving forward is not an option.

3. Some of us may have opted out of retooling.

4. Some of us are confused.  Though we have relatively new standards and documents that address what school library should look like now, we are looking at a moving target. And many of us–and our administrators and professors–need a clear(er) picture at which to aim.  For nearly every profession, the Web has created power and focus shifts.  Ours has been affected profoundly.  We have no textbook for reinterpreting practice in this brave new information/communication world.  And, perhaps, it really should look more like a shared family cookbook than a textbook.

5. All of this resonates with my personal favorite, and, in my mind, the most relevant of Ranganathan’s laws of library science: 5: The library is a growing organism.

It is critical that we demonstrate and share.  For many of us the vision is crystal clear.  We may interpret contemporary service differently for different populations, but certain essential themes are common across the practice of any of us who are seriously scanning the environment.

Back in October, I revised the little Manifesto I worked on a couple of years ago for my VOYA column. It described my own personal perspective regarding what school library practice should look like.

Please share, add, or pull it apart in your comments.

Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians

My prompt:

A couple of summers back a young school librarian, fresh out of library school, asked a very honest question at one of our state retreats:

We’re all doing different stuff. The other school librarians I know are not doing what I am doing. Some maintain Web sites and blogs; others do not. Some have seriously retooled; others have not. In the 21st century, what does a school librarian do?

Well into the 21st century, it is clear that the concept of modern teacher librarian practice is not clear. There is no textbook for what effective practice looks like in continually morphing information and communication landscapes.

What I know for sure is that if the Joyce who graduated from library school in 1976 (and again with a school specialty in 1988), heck, if the Joyce from the 2007/2008 school year, were to visit my library today, she would be stunned by the differences in my/our practice.

In the past few years many of us have re-imagined school library for learners using the array of new tools and abilities in front of us today.

And in my humble opinion some aspects of emerging practice are nonnegotiable.

Reading

● You explore new ways to promote and celebrate reading. You are piloting/equipping learners with both traditional, new, and emerging book formats–downloadable audio books, Playaways, Kindles, iPads, Nooks.

● You share ebook apps with students for their iPhones, droids, and iPads and other mobile devices (Check out Gale’s AccessMyLibrary, School Edition)

● You market, and your students share, books using social networking tools like Shelfari, Good Reads, or LibraryThing.

● Your students blog or tweet or network in some way communicate and reflect about what they are reading

● Your desktop screensavers promote great reads, not Dell or Apple or HP.

● You link to available free ebook collections using such tools as Google Books, International Children’s Digital Library (See our own ebook pathfinder.)

● You review and promote books in your own blogs and wikis and other websites.

● You embed ebooks on your websites to encourage reading and support learning.

● You work together with learners to create and share digital booktalks or book trailers.


Information Landscape

● You know that searching various areas of the Web requires a variety of search tools. You are the information expert in your building. You are the search expert in your building. You share an every growing and shifting array of search tools that reach into blogs and wikis and Twitter and images and media and scholarly content.

● You open your students to evolving strategies for collecting and evaluating information. You teach about tags, and hashtags, and feeds, and real-time searches and sources, as well as the traditional database approaches you learned way back in library school.

● You organize the Web for learners. You have the skills to create a blog or website or wiki or portal of some other type to pull together resources to meet the specific information needs of your learning community.

● You make sure your learners and teachers can (physically & intellectually) access developmentally and curricularly databases, portals, websites, blogs, videos, and other media.

● Your Web presence reflects your personal and professional voice. It includes your advice and your instruction. You make learning an engaging and colorful hybrid experience.

● You think of your web presence as a knowledge management tool for your entire school. It includes student-produced instruction and archived (celebrated) student work, handouts, policies, and collaboratively built pathfinders to support learning and research in all learning arenas. (Checkout Pathfinder Swap for examples.)

● You help learners put together their own personal information portals and Knowledge Building Centers to support their research and learning, using widgets, embedded media, and personal information portals like iGoogle and NetVibes and wikis and Google Sites.

● You intervene transparently in the research process online while respecting young people’s need for privacy.

● You work with learners to exploit push information technologies like RSS feeds and tags and saved database and search engine searches relevant to their information needs.

● Your own feeds are rich with learning content, evidence of your networking. You embed dynamic widgets (including your own database widgets) wherever students live, work, and play.

● You integrate dynamic interactive features in your library’s website–Google calendars, RSS feeds, delicious bookmarks, photo galleries, online presentations, blogs, surveys, polls, as ways to interact with and teach students.
Communication and publishing and storytelling

● You know that communication is the end-product of research and you teach learners how to communicate and participate creatively and engagingly. You consider new interactive and engaging communication tools for student projects.

● Include and collaborate with your learners. You let them in. You fill your physical and virtual space with student work, student contributions—their video productions, their original music, their art.

● Know and celebrate that students can now publish their written work digitally. (See these pathfinders: DigitalStorytellingTools and DigitalPublishingTools)

Collection Development

● You expand your notion of collection.

● Though you want to offer learners choice, you no longer strive for the standard catalog, long-tail, just-in-case approach. In tight times, with shared catalogs and easy online purchasing, a just-in-time approach may be more effective. You build your own collection collaboratively, with an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the available collections around you.

● Your collection includes: ebooks, audiobooks, open source software, streaming media, flash drives, digital video cameras, laptops, tripods, RSS feeds, and much more! And we should seek effective, federated approaches to ensure these diverse formats and platforms are equally and seamlessly accessible.

● You involve your community in collection building using interactive polls and web-based suggestion forms.

● You understand that library is not just a place to get stuff, it is a place to make stuff, collaborate on and share stuff. Not a grocery store, but a kitchen!

● Your collection–on- and offline–includes student work. You use digital publishing tools to help students share and celebrate their written and artistic work.
Facilities, your physical space

● You know your physical space is about books and way more than books. Your space is a libratory. You welcome, and create space for, media production—podcasting, video production, storytelling–producing and presenting.

● You welcome and host telecommunications events and group gathering for planning and research and social networking.

● You cope with ubiquity. No, you learn to love it. Ubiquity changes everything. In one-to-one schools, students may visit the library less frequently. In such environments, in all modern, truly relevant environments, library must also be ubiquitous. Library MUST be everywhere. Librarians must teach everywhere, in and outside of the library.

● You realize you will often have to partner and teach in classroom teachers’ classrooms. One-to-one classrooms change your teaching logistics. You teach virtually. You are available across the school via email and chat.

● You know that laptops can actually walk back to the library for its space and additional resources in all formats.

Access , Equity, Advocacy

● You are concerned about a new digital divide: those who can effectively find quality information in all media formats, and those who cannot.

● You are concerned about a new digital divide: those who have access to the new tools for creation and publishing and those who do not.

● You consider just-in-time, just-for-me learning as your responsibility and are proud that you own real estate your students’ desktops and mobile devices 24/7.

● You grapple with issues of equity. You provide open source alternatives to students and teachers who need them. You lend flash sticks and laptops and cameras and . . . You ensure your students can easily get to the stuff they most need by using kid-friendly terms and by creating pathfinders.

● You ensure that all students have access to readings appropriate for their differentiated needs and offer books in a variety of formats.

● You know that one-to-one classrooms will change your teaching logistics. You realize you will often have to partner and teach in classroom teachers’ classrooms. You will teach virtually. You will be available across and outside the school via email and chat.

● You don’t stop at “no.” You fight for the rights of students to have and use the tools they need. This is an equity issue. Access to the new tools is an intellectual freedom issue.

Audience and collaboration

● You recognize that the work your students create has audience and that they may share newly constructed knowledge globally on powerful networks,. You help them see that they have the potential to make social, cultural, and political impact.

● You recognize that learners may share their ideas and participate in dialogs beyond the walls of the library or classroom.

● You exploit the cloud as a strategy for student collaboration, sharing and publishing.

● You share with students their responsibilities for participating in social networks.

● You see teleconferencing tools like Skype as ways to open your library to authors, experts, book discussion, debates, and more. Consider starting by examining Skype an Author Network.

● You use new tools for collaboration. Your students create together, They synthesize information, enhance their writing through peer review and negotiate content in blogs and wikis and using tools like GoogleDocs, Flickr, Voicethread, Animoto and a variety of other writing or mind mapping and storytelling tools.

● You help students create their own networks for learning and extracurricular activities.

Copyright, Copyleft and Information Ethics

● You teach students to care about their own digital footprints–and monitor them using people search tools.

● You encourage students to develop academic–NOT invisible–digital footprints.

● You teach students about norms for appropriate behavior in wikis and blogs.

● You model respect for intellectual property in a world of shift and change. You encourage and guide documentation for media in all formats.

● You lead students to Web-based citation generators and note-taking tools to guide them in these efforts.

● You recognize and lead students and teachers to the growing number of copyright-friendly or copyleft portals.

● You understand Creative Commons licensing and you are spreading its gospel.

● You encourage learners to apply Creative Commons licenses to their own creations.

● You are revising and expanding your notion of Fair Use in line with the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education.  You say “yes” a lot more. You know that in their creative remixes and mash-ups, students may use the copyrighted works of others in their own work without asking permission under certain conditions. You are discussing transformativeness with students and faculty. (See my post, The Cost of Copyright Confusion for Media Literacy and Fair use and transformativeness: It may shake your world)

● You use a tool for reasoning whether a proposed use is Fair Use. (Tool for reasoning Fair Use.pdf)

You ask students to ask these two questions when they are using the copyrighted work of others in their own media:

1. Did the unlicensed use transform the material taken from the copyrighted work by using it for a different purpose than that of the original, or did it just repeat the work for the same intent and value as the original?

2. Was the material taken appropriate in kind and amount, considering the nature of the copyrighted work and of the use?

(From the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education)

New Technology Tools

● You consider iPods and iPhones and iPads learning tools as storage devices and reference sources. You know that when you interrupt a student she might be (or may soon be) in the middle of a chapter, recording a podcast, transferring data, taking audio notes. You establish classroom or library academic guidelines and norms for use of personal mobile devices during the school day.

● You know this is only the beginning of social networking. Students will get to their Facebook accounts through proxy servers and their mobile devices despite any efforts to block them. You plan educationally meaningful ways to incorporate student excitement (and your own) for social networking. You establish classroom or library academic guidelines and norms for their use during the school day.

● You consider your role as info-technology scout. You look to make “learning sense” of the authentic new information and communication tools used in business and academics. You figure out how to use them thoughtfully and you help classroom teachers use them with their classes.

Professional Development and Professionalism

● You seek professional development that will help you grow even if it is not offered by your school district. Even if you don’t get PD credit. You can’t “clock” these hours.

● You build your own personal/professional learning network using social networking tools

● You guide your teacher colleagues in setting up their own professional learning networks.

● You read both edtech journals and edtech blogs, not just the print literature of our own profession.

● You follow selected educators, experts, authors, etc. with microblogging apps like Twitter

● You use Twitter to mine realtime chat about your professional interests. You use hashtags like #tlchat and #edchat

● You learn by visiting the webcast archives of conferences you cannot attend.

● You share your new knowledge with others using social bookmarking tools like Delicious and Diigo.

● You set up feed readers to push the blog of experts and educators you respect to you on a regular basis.

● You join a social network for instance:

● You are contributing to the development of a new brand for our profession. When your students move on to the next library, they are going to expect visionary service and instruction and caring, helpful relationships.

Teaching and Learning and Reference

● You are figuring out how to be present for your learners and teachers 24/7, at the point of the instructional, research, or communication need. Ubiquity changes everything. With computers in every classroom and every home, heck with computers in every pocket, how are you going to share your wisdom and collaborate?

● You understand that learning can (and should) be playful.

● You understand that learning should be authentic.

● You understand that learning can be multi-modal, media-rich, customized to the needs of individual learners.

● You know the potential new technologies offer for interaction–learners as both information consumers and producers. You understand that in this world learners have the power to create and share knowledge.

● You are concerned that, when it matters, your students move beyond information satisficing.

● You are concerned that students learn to evaluate, to triangulate information in all media formats.  In an increasingly complex world, it is essential that they learn to make information decisions, to evaluate all their information choices, including books, blogs, wikis, streamed media, whatever comes next.

● You continually share new understandings of searching, and evaluation, and analysis and synthesis, and digital citizenship, and communication, integrating and modeling our new standards, dispositions and common beliefs.

● You understand that exploration and freedom are key to engaging students in a virtual environment to promote independent learning.

● You know the potential new technologies offer for interaction–learners as both information consumers and creative information producers.

● You ensure that the library provides an independent learning environment that connects students and teachers in a social, digital, community.

Into the Future (acknowledging the best of the past)

● You unpack the good stuff you carried from your 20th century trunk. Rigor, and inquiry, and high expectations, and information and media fluency matter no matter what the medium. So do excitement, engagement, and enthusiasm.

● You lead. And you look ahead for what is coming down the road. You continually scan the landscape. As the information and communication landscapes continue to shift, you plan.  You plan for change. Not for yourself, not just for the library, but for the building and for your learners.

● You see the big picture and let others see you seeing it. It’s about learning and teaching. It’s about engagement. If you are seen only as the one who closes up for inventory, as the book chaser, and NOT as the CIO, the inventor, the creative force, the change agent you won’t be seen as a big picture person.

● You continue to retool and learn.

● You represent our brand (who the teacher-librarian is) as a 21st century information professional. What does the information professional look like today? Ten years from today? If you do not develop strong vision, your vision will be usurped by the visions of others. You will not be able to lead from the center.

● You enjoy what you do and let others know it. It’s always better when you do what you love. (And, if you don’t love this new library world, find something else to do.)

● You continue to consider and revise your vision and feed it with imagination. Think outside the box. Heck, there is no box!

share save 171 16 A revised manifesto
Joyce Valenza About Joyce Valenza

Joyce is the teacher-librarian at Springfield Township High School, a technology writer, and a blogger. Follow her on Twitter: @joycevalenza

Comments

  1. Judith says:

    Wow Joyce, this is a Bible for our profession. Thank you so much!

  2. Amy Bowllan says:

    Thank you, indeed, Joyce! Our school has created a committee to take a library to the next level of growth. We’ve already received via our librarian, your October manifesto. This is timely!
    I don’t know which subtopic you would include this but I believe….

    YOU, the 21st century librarian is taking on the vital role of being a librarian/reporter if you will. Looking for the story, researching it, fact checking, and reporting back, using the tools -Flip cameras and editing software – to get the story on the ‘air’.

  3. Gary Green says:

    Even though I’m not a school librarian (I’m a public librarian) I think this manifesto is great. There’s so much of it that’s relevant to others outside the school library profession too.

  4. Hilda Weisbug says:

    This is a discussion that is vital! If we keep doing buisiness the way we did, we will be out of business — and deserve it. We have great minds in this profession– and Joyce is one of the greatest — but we need to get them working on redefining what a school librray should look like and what a library program should be in th 21st century. Let’s use the tough tmes to start thinking out of the box — build a new box — or even go boxless.

  5. Linda McSweeney says:

    Still basking in the glow of VT ASCD in Stowe last week! Many thanks for making the chilly trip to Vermont. So many amazing ideas–bought a wide-format printer (on sale this week at Staples!), created Wordle Genre posters and my first QR code for our library’s website. On to Gale mobile apps tmw.

    A quick question–we are having a series of L4L Boot Camps in Vermont. I would love to make copies of your Manifesto to hand out. Is that possible?

  6. Kay Oddone says:

    Hi Joyce
    I’d love to use this manifesto as the basis for an activity with a group of Teacher Librarians. I am going to use the manifesto as a way for TLs to identify their areas of strength and the areas in which they need further PD, and then get them to share tips with others based upon their areas of strength. Is it ok to reproduce the manifesto for this purpose? I shall give full credit to you of course. Thanks so much,

Trackbacks

  1. [...] bin ich aus Bozen zurück, finde ich bei Joyce Velenza das „Handbuch“ für meine Vision des Schulbibliothekars des 21. [...]

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  3. [...] Shared A revised manifesto « NeverEndingSearch. [...]

  4. [...] Valenza, Joyce. “A Revised Manifesto.” NeverEnding Search 3 Dec. 2010. Web. 19 June 2012. <http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto&gt;. [...]

  5. [...] Valenza, J. (2010, December, 3rd). “In the 21st century, what does a school librarian do?” Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  6. [...] http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ This entry was posted in Uncategorized by peita. Bookmark the permalink. [...]

  7. [...] couldn’t begin to summarise Joyce Valenza’s revised manifesto on what a 21st century TL should do. All of it is already succinctly summarised, all of it is [...]

  8. [...] Joyce Valenza (2010). In the 21st century, what does a school librarian do? In Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  9. [...] Valenza, A revised manifesto Teilen Sie dies mit:MehrGefällt mir:Gefällt mirSei der Erste dem dies [...]

  10. [...] Joyce Valenza (2010). In the 21st century, what does a school librarian do? In Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  11. [...] J. (2010, December 3rd) [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/       No Comments so far Leave a comment Click here to cancel [...]

  12. [...] Joyce Valenza (2010). In the 21st century, what does a school librarian do? In Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  13. [...] One of the best things to read about the issue of our role and profile is the Manifesto by Joyce Valenza. [...]

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  15. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal . Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in Uncategorized by [...]

  16. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In Neverending Search. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in ETL401 by [...]

  17. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like [...]

  18. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved 19 March, 2013 from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookPinterestGoogle +1Like this:Like [...]

  19. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Filed under Uncategorized | Leave a [...]

  20. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In Neverending Search. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in ETL401 by [...]

  21. [...] J. (2010, December 3). A revised manifesto [Blog post]. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Filed under Uncategorized | Leave a [...]

  22. [...] J. (2010, December 3). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like [...]

  23. [...] Valenza’s, J. (2010, December 3). Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians [Online forum comment]. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  24. [...] Valenza, J. (2010, December 3). A revised manifesto [Blog post]. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  25. [...] J (2010) A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in Uncategorized by [...]

  26. [...] J (2010) Manifesto For 21st Century School Librarians.  Retrieved from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/  Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in ETL401 by Miss [...]

  27. [...] 30-33. Valenza, J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Bookmark the permalink. Leave a [...]

  28. [...] 30-33. Valenza, J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Bookmark the permalink. Leave a [...]

  29. [...] Valenza’s, J. (2010, December 3). Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians [Online forum comment]. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  30. [...] J (2010). Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians. Retrieved from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in ETL 401 on March 25, [...]

  31. [...] Valenza, J. (2010, December 3). A revised manifesto [Blog post]. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  32. [...] J. (2010, December 3). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like [...]

  33. [...] (Dec. 3, 2010).  A Revised Manifesto: Manifesto for 21st Century School Libraries Retrieved from  http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like [...]

  34. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like [...]

  35. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like [...]

  36. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal . Retrieved from             http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in Uncategorized by [...]

  37. [...] Valenza, J. (2010, December 3rd). School Library Journal. Retrieved March 13th, 2013, from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  38. [...] J. (2010). Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians. Retrieved 20 March 2013 from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like [...]

  39. [...] from: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… This entry was posted in Uncategorized. [...]

  40. [...] J. (2010) Revised Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians. Retrieved 25th May, 2013, from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… « Previous [...]

  41. [...] J. (2010, December 23). A revised manifesto. Retrieved July 24, 2013, from School library journal: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogle +1Like this:Like [...]

  42. [...] J. (2010, December 23). A revised manifesto. Retrieved July 24, 2013, from School library journal: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogle +1Like this:Like [...]

  43. [...] J. (2010) Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogle +1Like this:Like [...]

  44. [...] Valenza, J. (2010). A revised manifesto.  In School Library Journal. Retrieved from                           http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  45. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. Retrieved from School Library Journal at http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogle +1Like this:Like Loading… Bookmark the [...]

  46. [...] J. (2010) Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians – accessed through: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ on 4.8.13 Like this:Like [...]

  47. [...] J. (2010). A revised manifesto. Retrieved from School Library Journal website: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogleLike this:Like [...]

  48. [...] J. (2010) A revised manifesto. In School Library Journal, Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ Share this:TwitterFacebookGoogleLike this:Like [...]

  49. [...] is my goal: to be an effective teacher librarian. Joyce Valenza’s manifesto found at http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ along with the ASLA website http://www.asla.org.au/ have become two, well frequented sites in my [...]

  50. [...] Valenza, J. (2010). A revised manifesto. In Never Ending Search. Retrieved from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  51. [...] Valenza, J. (2010). Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians Retrieved from School Library Journal website: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  52. [...] Valenza, J. (2010). Manifesto for 21st century school librarians Retrieved from School Library Journal website: http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

  53. [...] Following is a very condensed and edited version (my edits) of Joyce Valenza’s original Manifesto for 21st Century Librarians.These are the services and goals I that I work daily to provide to my learners and teachers. The [...]

  54. [...] Valenza, J. (2010) Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians – Retrieved 6 August 2014, from http://blogs.slj.com/neverendingsearch/2010/12/03/a-revised-manifesto/ [...]

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