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Someday My Printz Will Come
Inside Someday My Printz Will Come

About Karyn Silverman

Karyn Silverman is the High School Librarian and Educational Technology Department Chair at LREI, Little Red School House & Elisabeth Irwin High School (say that ten times fast!). Karyn has served on YALSA’s Quick Picks and Best Books committees and was a member of the 2009 Printz committee. She has reviewed for Kirkus and School Library Journal. She has a lot of opinions about almost everything, as long as all the things are books. Said opinions do not reflect the attitudes or opinions of SLJ, LREI, YALSA or any other institutions with which she is affiliated. Find her on Twitter @InfoWitch or e-mail her at karynsilverman at gmail dot com.

Picks and Predictions

Will our crystal ball accurately predict the RealPrintz? (And yes, I know it's really a golden ball.) Image CC BY Pixel2013

Will our crystal ball accurately predict the RealPrintz? (And yes, I know it’s really a golden ball.) Image CC BY Pixel2013

Now that you’ve had a few hours to digest the news that this is our last time doing picks and predictions, and you’ve also had some time to consider your own thoughts for each category, let’s do this thing!

We’ll start with the definitions: Picks are the personal choices. It’s the slate of books you can support as contenders — but more than that, it’s the slate of your heart, the books that both exemplify excellence AND resonate for you. The books you want everyone to read. The ones whose inclusion in the official list would maybe bring tears to your eyes. Then there are predictions: Books you think WILL win, even if you personally would never choose them.

(Please note that this is not in any way like the RealCommittee process. They discuss and vote, vote and discuss; it’s about heads and consensus. But we’re in the speculation business.)

Jump below the fold for details and a quick breakdown of how we’ve done with predictions in the past.

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News

CC BY; Image by Alexas_Fotos

CC BY; Image by Alexas_Fotos

We interrupt our usual year-end post schedule with some breaking news: This will be the last season for the Someday My Printz Will Come blog.

While we are incredibly sad about this, it’s not a permanent goodbye. The SLJ folks have assured us of their continuing commitment to YA award coverage, and we like talking books to much to ever really stop. So while we don’t know what tomorrow will bring, we’re sure good things will come.

We’ll have more, and more sentimental, thoughts after these last few days of the season — but for now, we need to write up our annual pick and predictions post, so get started thinking about yours, and tomorrow we will all speculate wildly once again! And since this is IT, let’s really make the conversation sizzle.

XOXO,

Karyn and Sarah and Joy

What a Treat: Guest Reviews

Back in November, we asked if any of our readers wanted to toss a “nomination” or two into the ring. Well, we have three! We are lucky to have wonderful readers and commenters, and even luckier to have three of them plugging their favorite books. Each review considers the book in light of its Printz chances; read on to see if you agree, disagree, or have some insights to add!

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Graphic Novel Roundup

Screen Shot 2018-01-22 at 2.41.45 PM

It hasn’t been an outstanding year for graphic format works with Printz potential — but a handful of books either have some buzz or have some potential, even if none of them are likely to be serious contenders. So read on for an alphabetical listing of graphic novels that might maybe could (but probably won’t) have Printzly aspirations.

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Divergent Dystopic Visions

Screen Shot 2018-01-21 at 11.30.26 AMNot Divergent divergent, but diverse, unexpected, small press books diverging from the post-apocalyptic formula of yesteryear: that’s what we’ve got for you today. The Marrow Thieves won both the Kirkus Prize and the Canadian Governor General’s Literary Award, and has shown up on the year-end lists for Kirkus and School Library Journal — not bad for a Canadian publication almost entirely under the radar stateside. All the Wind in the World is Samantha Mabry’s sophomore effort after last year’s enticing A Fierce and Subtle Poison. It’s a quiet book in terms of buzz, although it had a strong showing out of the gate with 3 stars and a place on the NBA longlist; it also made Booklist‘s Editor’s Choice.

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Pyrite Time Is Here Again!

Adapted from photo by James St. John, CC BY 2.0

Adapted from photo by James St. John, CC BY 2.0

Yes, you read that right: It’s Pyrite time!

In case this is your first rodeo: The Pyrite is Someday’s Mock Printz. Instead of gold, we award fool’s gold — because mock/fool, right? (Puns may be the lowest form of humor to some, but I never met one I didn’t like.) We have no affiliation with the actual Printz, and no insider trading knowledge, but on the best years, our Pyrite slate overlaps with the RealCommittee slate, and then we get to pat ourselves on the backs and feel wicked smart.

 

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The Book of Dust

Book of Dust coverThis isn’t necessarily a big book in Printz speculation terms, but it’s a big book in the kidlit field; lots of excited librarians, lots of buzzing adults, lots of stars, lots of sales. Which means it’s the kind of book the RealCommittee is likely to look at, and it’s also the kind of book that we all wanted to read, so it was a solid candidate for a round-table review.

But then Joy decided to be a fan and not read this for critique purposes (and really, do you blame her? Sometimes it’s so nice not to worry about what you’ll say about a book). Karyn and Sarah, on the other hand, decided to use the critique to work through our conflicting feelings, so this is only a two-person discussion — but we’re hoping it will become a more-person discussion in the comments. We know some of you will strongly disagree with what we have to say.

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The Walters

The Walter Award has been announced, along with two honor books, and all three are books we’ve already talked about in terms of Printz contention —  although we only support one of them strongly. Of course, the Walter is a different award, with a different purpose, but the committee is looking for “outstanding books” so it’s fascinating to look at which books they recognized from a year that is relatively rich in diverse titles.

(Yes, we still need more diverse books and more #ownvoices books and yes the numbers are still woefully low — but relative to previous years, it’s more than what we’ve had.)

Does WNDB/Walter recognition for Disappeared and You Bring the Distant Near push them higher on anyone’s Printz speculation? Does the win for A Long Way Down change your bets for its Printzly potential? Speculate away!

 

More Previous Winners, with a Side of Uh-Oh

Screen Shot 2018-01-09 at 6.09.55 AMTwo books today, both fantasy. All the Crooked Saints technically belonged in last week’s previous winners cluster, as Stiefvater received an honor for 2012’s The Scorpio Races, but it ran over the word count. And That Inevitable Victorian Thing seemed like a good book to pair with it; Johnston, like Stiefvater, loves to play with old stories in new forms, and has a Morris, making her a previous winner — albeit not a Printz winner. Also, both fall into the problematic books from beloved authors category. So with no further introduction, here goes:

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Sleepers

Via giphy, and here because they say images are good. And who doesn’t love a sleeping panda?

2017 is done and there’s nothing else to be reviewed by the review outlets and everyone who isn’t on the artificial ALA timeline is looking at 2018 instead (ok, including me: I’m currently engrossed in the dark and mesmerizing The Hazel Wood, which name-checks like every book that made me, so you can imagine how much I am loving it, but really I have no business turning to 2018 yet). In other words, it’s that awful time of year when I’ve read everything on my to-read list that I wanted to read, and I’m left with a handful I should read (but really don’t want to)… and a sense that there must be more out there to entice me.

(And while I’m talking a lot about myself, I am assured that Sarah and Joy are in the same place, and probably all the wonderful librarians serving on actual committees are feeling the same, except with more pressure and hopefully less self-pity.)

So let’s do one of those delightful short posts where really all we do is ask for your feedback. We want to hear what you’ve been loving. What are the under the radar reads, the sleepers, the books of your heart that aren’t already getting all the buzz and attention? Feel free to contextualize in terms of Printz likeliness — but also feel free to just wax rhapsodic about books you’ve loved this year that you want everyone else to love too, except you think maybe no one else even knows about them.