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Reimagining the author visit: a statewide approach

Every once in a while you discover a confluence of opportunity. This happened when a team of librarians and educators in New Jersey discovered that Jacqueline Woodson, the Library of Congress National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature was visiting our state for two events.

Netflix: honing your search using secret genre codes

Planning to hunker down with the family and do a little streaming this holiday season? Here’s a hack that may eliminate the crazy scrolling for consensus and promote domestic tranquillity. If you are a Netflix subscriber, instead of randomly browsing through endless horizontal lines of broad category options, there’s a way to bypass the scrolling […]

Teaching with Ken Burns in the Classroom

For more than 40 years, we’ve been privileged to tour history through the rich and creative lens of Ken Burns and his collaborators. The renowned documentarian now presents new ways to incorporate his body of work into learning experiences in our classrooms and libraries. Ken Burns describes the importance of the UNUM project: UNUM is […]

#notatAASL, no worries!

I was among the fortunate who were able to attend the AASL National Conference in Louisville this week. We are all fortunate that a dedicated and hardworking social media squad had our backs.  So whether you suffered FOMO over sessions you couldn’t fit in, or couldn’t get into, or if you couldn’t attend onsite, you are covered. […]

Wikipedia + the Internet Archive offer a new reason to include Wikipedia in student research

The Internet Archive and an army of Wikipedians are working towards achieving improved consensus around knowledge and greater historical accuracy by, as founder Brewster Kahle shares, weaving books into the fabric of the web itself. Last week, at its annual celebration, the Internet Archive announced the initiative in which it will be Weaving Books into […]

Introducing the Universal School Library, a new Internet Archive collection

Last week, the Internet Archive announced the opening of the Universal School Library (USL), “a growing collection of digitized books within the Internet Archive’s larger holdings, made available through controlled digital lending, and curated by a national advisory group of school librarians, librarian educators and researchers.” Currently in an early phase of its development, USL’s ultimate […]

Slido + Google Slides: I’ve been searching for this solution!

For years I’ve been trying to find a solution for creating interactive presentations without having to leave my platform of personal choice, Google Slides. For years, I’ve McGuyvered solutions which involved bringing my created slides into another platform. (If you’ve ever seen one of my slide-heavy presentations, you know that is not a real solution.) […]

What school librarians make (revisited)

Back in November of 2010, I wrote a response to a superintendent’s proposed elimination of school libraries in New York State. Recent ill-informed threats to school librarians and the equity they provide across our country inspired me to update a poem I wrote in the style of Taylor Mali’s classic response to an ignorant dinner […]

Nepris: Matchmaker for classroom experts on demand

Way back in 2015, I shared a post about Nepris: Matchmaker for STEAM Learning. It’s time for a bit of an update. The libraries of archived sessions are nowsubstantial and free, as are a wealth of other materials to inspire exploration of our students’ next steps. If you haven’t yet discovered it, Nepris is a social […]

New from Stanford: The interactive Educational Opportunity Project for “educational epidemiology”

Image: Educational Opportunity Project at Stanford University

A new interactive data tool from the Educational Opportunity Project at Stanford University shares access to information about academic performance across public schools and districts throughout the United States. The platform offers educators, journalists, parents, and policymakers a way to explore and compare data from Stanford’s Education Data Archive (SEDA), the first comprehensive national database of […]